polski

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About polski

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  • Four Letter Airport Code For Weather Obs (Such as KDCA)
    KLWM
  • Gender
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  • Location:
    West Newbury MA
  • Interests
    skiing, fishing

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  1. ^^^ is rather elevation-dependent
  2. Yeah, real good stuff. One quibble is I don't think the line graph is optimal for the Storm Report Trend as that will always move upward as a day progresses (unless there are reports early and then none the rest of the day - the chart in there now for 3/21 shows a line just ending after a couple hours with just two wind reports). On a particularly busy day/night the line will go parabolic but you'd only be able to determine the "busiest" time by trying to see where the slope steepens. I think a column chart with # reports per hour or every two hours would be more informative, so you can easily see the spikes. A text box could still give the total number of reports for the day, as in the existing display. However, if tornado + hail + wind are in the same display, clutter could be an issue, unless perhaps if the columns were kept very narrow (barely more than vertical lines) and/or the time interval were increased to three or four hours. It also might be useful to be able to toggle that chart between the calendar day and last 24 hours, in the case of systems that don't fade after sunset but keep marching on overnight. Of course the trends will be confounded on days when there are multiple systems in different parts of the country - ideally there would be a way for a user to set which WWs to include in the trend chart, but admittedly that would be a non-trivial programming task. (yes I am submitting these thoughts to the SPC web feedback email address)
  3. Things start really ripping about 1:30 into this. From my driveway, illuminated by brand new floodlights ... The snow highlights fascinating patterns in the wind gusts, including at times the snow being driven with great force straight down into the surface. Perhaps one reason I "only" have 24" here as of noon (though still snowing moderately in an outside band that just won't quit).
  4. This seems as good a thread as any to put this in ... started snowing here ~15 min ago and already there's as much of a dusting as I got last night. Sure enough there's a little blob of blue on the radar overhead. Tapering off already though ... just like last night.
  5. Update: GYX surveys have confirmed two EF-1s in Maine: 000 NOUS41 KGYX 030312 CCA PNSGYX MEZ007>009-012>014-018>028-NHZ001>010-013-014-031200 PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAY ME 1112 PM EDT THU JUN 02 2011 ...TORNADO CONFIRMED IN BRYANT POND IN OXFORD COUNTY MAINE... LOCATION...2 MILES NORTHWEST OF BRYANT POND IN OXFORD COUNTY MAINE DATE...06/01/2011 ESTIMATED TIME...335 PM MAXIMUM EF-SCALE RATING/CAUSE...EF-1 ESTIMATED MAXIMUM WIND SPEED...85 TO 100 MPH MAXIMUM PATH WIDTH...25 YARDS PATH LENGTH...0.25 MILES BEGINNING LAT/LON 44.40383 -70.68166 ENDING LAT/LON 44.40540 -70.67698 FATALITIES...0 INJURIES...0 ...SUMMARY... THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN GRAY ME HAS CONFIRMED A TORNADO ABOUT 2 MILES NORTHWEST OF THE TOWN OF BRYANT POND IN OXFORD COUNTY MAINE ON 06/01/2011. THE TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN ALONG GORE ROAD ON THE SOUTHWEST SHORE OF NORTH POND AND MOVED OUT OVER NORTH POND BEFORE DISSIPATING. THE TORNADO SNAPPED OR UPROOTED NUMEROUS TREES. LARGE TREE BRANCHES WERE CARRIED MORE THAN A HALF MILE TO THE OPPOSITE SHORE OF NORTH POND. THIS INFORMATION CAN ALSO BE FOUND ON OUR WEBSITE AT WEATHER.GOV/GRAY. $ ST. JEAN NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAY, MAINE 000 NOUS41 KGYX 030226 PNSGYX MEZ007>009-012>014-018>028-NHZ001>010-013-014-030630- PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAY ME 1026 PM EDT THU JUN 2 2011 ...TORNADO CONFIRMED FROM NEW PORTLAND TO EMBDEN IN SOMERSET COUNTY MAINE... LOCATION...NEW PORTLAND AND EMBDEN IN SOMERSET COUNTY MAINE DATE...6/1/11 ESTIMATED TIME...5:51-6:06 PM MAXIMUM EF-SCALE RATING/CAUSE...EF1 ESTIMATED MAXIMUM WIND SPEED...90-100 MPH MAXIMUM PATH WIDTH...200 YARDS PATH LENGTH...8.4 MILES BEGINNING LAT/LON...44.9087N/-70.0273W ENDING LAT/LON...44.8995N/-69.8566W * FATALITIES...0 * INJURIES...0 * NOTE THESE NUMBERS COULD CHANGE AFTER ISSUANCE OF THIS PRODUCT. ...SUMMARY... THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN GRAY ME HAS CONFIRMED THAT A TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN IN SOMERSET COUNTY MAINE ON 6/1/11. THE TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN NEAR SCHOOL STREET IN THE TOWN OF NEW PORTLAND WHERE MINOR TREE DAMAGE WAS OBSERVED. FROM THERE...THE TORNADO TRAVELED EAST ABOUT 8 MILES THROUGH TOWN OF EMBDEN TO THE KENNEBEC RIVER WHERE IT LIFTED OFF THE GROUND. THE TORNADO CROSSED EMBDEN POND...SAND POND AND FAHI POND IN EMBDEN. ALONG ITS PATH...THE TORNADO SNAPPED OR UPROOTED HUNDREDS OF TREES AND DAMAGED SEVERAL BUILDINGS AND AT LEAST ONE VEHICLE. ALONG THE PATH...THE MOST SIGNIFICANT DAMAGE WAS OBSERVED NEAR EMBDEN POND ROAD WHERE WINDS WERE ESTIMATED TO BE BETWEEN 90 AND 100 MPH. BASED ON THE DAMAGE IN THIS AREA...THE TORNADO WAS RATED AN E-F1 ON THE ENHANCED FUJITA SCALE. THE MAXIMUM PATH WIDTH WAS ESTIMATED TO BE ABOUT 200 YARDS...ALSO NEAR EMBDEN POND ROAD. THIS INFORMATION CAN ALSO BE FOUND ON OUR WEBSITE AT WEATHER.GOV/GYX. $ JENSENIUS NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAY MAINE
  6. Further reply to powderfreak's history question, from http://www.tornadohistoryproject.com/ (based on SPC archive): Definitely no other F3s in New England or New York since 1998. Most substantial tornado 'round these parts since then may have been the 7/24/2008 52-mile track from Deerfield NH, where it killed a woman, into ME, but that was F2. 1950-2010 I tally the following for New England: MA: three F4 (one mostly in NY but with four fatalities in westernmost MA, though without further research I can't say for certain that F3 or F4 damage occurred in MA) and four F3. As an aside, according to this archive yesterday's tornadoes were the first of any kind in MA since July 2008. (Sorry wiz but as others have said, YOU DID THE RIGHT THING) CT: two F4, four F3 RI: nothing stronger than F1 VT: at most just one F3, the last five miles of the 30-mile track beginning in Mechanicsville NY in that 1998 outbreak - without further research I don't know if any F3 damage occurred in VT NH: two F3, one of them (in Exeter) the day of the Worcester MA long-track in 1953 ME: nothing stronger than F2 One other quick note re yesterday: Early in the event there were reports relayed by NH Dept of Safety of a TOG in Jefferson NH. The Dept of Safety spokesman said last night those reports were in error. No indication in LSRGYX of anything in NH or ME other than a report from the public of a funnel cloud to the north of Oxford ME. Also checked other area LSRs and also nothing in VT, CT or RI, and only a funnel reported by a trained spotter in NY a bit W of the VT line. So it appears the only confirmed tornadoes were in MA.
  7. Cool, thanks. Though that lists Great Barrington as F4, and uses the SPC historical archive as its source, and I confirmed it says F4 in there, not F3, fwiw ...
  8. Not seeing anyone has replied to this. Don't know if there's been an F3 or greater since in New England or NY. The 7/24/2008 long-track tornado starting in Deerfield NH was EF-2 per http://www.aos.wisc....ter_Straus.pdf. Going back before 1998, some Google hits say Great Barrington MA 5/29/95 was F4 but this seeming authoritative documentation says F3: http://journals.amet...0.1175/WAF957.1