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September Discussion Thread: Bring the frost; kill the bugs.


moneypitmike
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5 hours ago, snowman21 said:

I'm not an expert on hydrology, but Oct 1st may start the year because that's when you start getting storms again that will increase water in rivers and snow in mountains which means September is the lowest point in that cycle since you've just gone through the summer and any snow from last winter/spring has melted and run off by that point.

Nailed it, highest correlation between streamflow and precipitation. 

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6 hours ago, snowman21 said:

I'm not an expert on hydrology, but Oct 1st may start the year because that's when you start getting storms again that will increase water in rivers and snow in mountains which means September is the lowest point in that cycle since you've just gone through the summer and any snow from last winter/spring has melted and run off by that point.

And yet   +6"    of rain per month, like we've gone through (ave) over these last 60 days.

So much for that climate base, huh. 

Let's see if October and November and December aggregate a foot to 18" of water or whatever in the fck-and-change it was. 

Better yet...let's do that, ...then have it get bone cold in Jan and February with 0   ... man,that'd chap some asses around here.

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More on water year trivia:
Checked on water year peak flow dates for 4 Maine rivers - St. John, Kennebec, Sandy, Carrabassett.
St. John was by far the most consistent, with 2% in March, 60% in April, 37% in May, plus August 1981.
The other 3 were fairly similar to each other.  By quarters:
JAM:  15%
AMJ:  52%  (Top 3-months: 57% for MAM)
JAS:     5%
OND:  28%
Although February was the least likely month for peak flow (only Carrabassett in the mega-mild Feb. 1981), JAS was by far the lowest in peak flows of any 3-month span.  Other regions may have different timing regimes, but for that trio of rivers, Oct. 1 makes a natural break point.
 

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Cutting up a tree today and caught a huge kettle of migrating raptors. By the time I grabbed my camera they had hit an updraft and were gone . Must have been hundreds...
 

Q: What makes a group of hawks a “kettle?” — Clair Van Buren, Bloomington, Indiana

A: Hawks and other raptors migrate during the day. As the sun heats the ground, warm air rises from the earth. Certain geographic features, including natural topography or human-built areas, can vary the rate and location of heating, creating columns of warm, ascending air. Birds can enter these updrafts, and by flying or soaring in a circle within the column, they can be lifted high into the sky. As the birds reach a height where the column dissipates because it meets increasingly cooler air, they can simply set their wings and glide down into another thermal in the direction they are headed. Using this method, the birds can travel quite far while conserving energy, as it takes far less effort than constant flapping.

 

kettle.jpg

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35 minutes ago, DavisStraight said:

My wife turned the heat on tonight, said it was too cold this morning, pretty early to turn it on, I think its usually in the middle of October average wise.

My house has been near 68 all day. It just holds in warmth. Hence why we AC in summer.

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41 minutes ago, CoastalWx said:

My house has been near 68 all day. It just holds in warmth. Hence why we AC in summer.

My place is outrageous with holding heat. One day this August I went to work without timing the AC and when I got home that night it was 93 inside. Brutal. 

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