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PhineasC

New England Firewood and Wood-Burning Thread

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3 hours ago, PowderBeard said:

https://www.gazettenet.com/King-letter-37262198

How long before Amherst bans pre-EPA woodstoves?  I have a couple neighbors that burn wet wood and put a fog through the neighborhood so I can understand why it irritates some people. 

Edit: They already require a license.

I guess out west it was a problem with air quality, that's why they did EPA stoves.....but here? I could see maybe somerville....but not Amherst

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Ok, so when I read the title of this thread...I initially was like, "Really??" But, it's soooo New England! It makes me chuckle...but I find it intriguing and pretty cool that your group bonds over firewood and burning techniques. Kudos on finding some non-weather and non-POLITICAL topics to chat about.

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15 hours ago, Baroclinic Zone said:

Amazing to see so many fire burners.  Haven’t had a fireplace as a means of heat in 20yrs.

Haven't lived in home with a fireplace since the place where I grew up 1950-71.  In 1973 or 74 I read an article that stated more than half the world's population used wood for heating and/or cooking, and thought to myself "How quaint."  In May 1977 I installed the Jotul 602 in our 1st house in Fort Kent the day before moving in and we've run woodstoves for most of our heat ever since.  What else should a forester in Maine do? 

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If wood isn't covered, but it's seasoned, how long does it take to dry out after it's been covered? Reason being is I have access to a bunch of logs that have been sitting for a few years so they're seasoned, but uncovered in a pile.  

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43 minutes ago, Whineminster said:

If wood isn't covered, but it's seasoned, how long does it take to dry out after it's been covered? Reason being is I have access to a bunch of logs that have been sitting for a few years so they're seasoned, but uncovered in a pile.  

Couple days, I stack three days worth in a rack not far from the stove and the helps dry it out then I put the next load right near the stove a few hours before it has to go into the stove, its dry as a bone by the time it makes it into the stove.

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Have dozens of these 10-15' cedars (?) that are dead around our property. Stove burns for maybe 90 min of decent heat but a great smell. Purdy to split. Actually cut about 10 .25" disks I will sand and seal to make into coasters given the designs on the inside. 

128345917_763107980943556_7289048221385030885_n.jpg?_nc_cat=105&ccb=2&_nc_sid=ae9488&_nc_ohc=knUB41UIrCoAX_BO_Kb&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&tp=6&oh=15a05eb4f132ccaf42ac9acc02955f4f&oe=5FEC24DC

 

No description available.

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24 minutes ago, PowderBeard said:

Have dozens of these 10-15' cedars (?) that are dead around our property. Stove burns for maybe 90 min of decent heat but a great smell. Purdy to split. Actually cut about 10 .25" disks I will sand and seal to make into coasters given the designs on the inside. 

128345917_763107980943556_7289048221385030885_n.jpg?_nc_cat=105&ccb=2&_nc_sid=ae9488&_nc_ohc=knUB41UIrCoAX_BO_Kb&_nc_ht=scontent-bos3-1.xx&tp=6&oh=15a05eb4f132ccaf42ac9acc02955f4f&oe=5FEC24DC

 

Eastern red cedar, the "cedar closet" species and the aroma that most associate with "cedar" - the name given to the many species with soft aromatic wood, tiny needles/leaves and stringy bark.  The "true" cedar, genus Cedrus, is the one on the flag of Lebanon.
Eastern red cedar is great at colonizing old fields but requires near-full sunshine to persist and rarely gets taller than 40 feet.  Thus it gets shaded out by the taller oaks/maples/birches, leaving decay-resistant carcasses on the ground.  We had those in abundance next to the NNJ lake where I ice-fished and they were the fuel of choice for our warming fires.

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First fire of the season tonight. Usually I burn starting Nov 1st but warm month, laziness and waiting to get flues cleaned kept me on the oil. 
Living room is already up to 72°

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On 11/30/2020 at 10:01 AM, PowderBeard said:

Have dozens of these 10-15' cedars (?) that are dead around our property. Stove burns for maybe 90 min of decent heat but a great smell. Purdy to split. Actually cut about 10 .25" disks I will sand and seal to make into coasters given the designs on the inside. 

stop wasting it on firewood, mill some boards out of them!!!

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23 hours ago, Whineminster said:

stop wasting it on firewood, mill some boards out of them!!!

My wife is the woodworker, not I. She has done some pretty amazing furniture and toddler toys. Might look into it but most of them are pretty dried and punky in spots. worth it?

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Reloading under the deck today. Packing in all the sugar maple and red oak in hopes for some snow and cold. Given the mild temps so far I've only really gone through my pine and elm piles (1.5 cord) while keeping the house in the low 70s. Wife has had to buy all new clothes for around the house because its too warm = mission accomplished. 

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1 hour ago, PowderBeard said:

Reloading under the deck today. Packing in all the sugar maple and red oak in hopes for some snow and cold. Given the mild temps so far I've only really gone through my pine and elm piles (1.5 cord) while keeping the house in the low 70s. Wife has had to buy all new clothes for around the house because its too warm = mission accomplished. 

Over 22 heating seasons our average HDD midpoint is January 21.  Due to higher sun angle and somewhat higher proportion of sunny days in the 2nd half, midpoint for fuel consumption is likely a few days earlier.  HDD midpoint has been as early as the 13th (09-10 with the super-warm Feb-May) and as late as the 28th (06-07 with the very AN temps Nov-Dec and Jan 1-13.)

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