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PhineasC

New England Firewood and Wood-Burning Thread

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1 hour ago, Cold Miser said:

I just noticed this thread. What is this space in the photo? That ceiling is quite high.

I used to enjoy splitting wood by hand. I know this sounds lame but it's actually relaxing. I don't have much experience taking trees down though.  

Welcome! It’s part of a 3 story barn on my property in Randolph. 

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2 hours ago, Cold Miser said:

I just noticed this thread. What is this space in the photo? That ceiling is quite high.

I used to enjoy splitting wood by hand. I know this sounds lame but it's actually relaxing. I don't have much experience taking trees down though.  

I loved cutting wood, splitting,  stacking. Better than any Gym in the world for core , cardio exercise plus something relaxing about it all.

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1 hour ago, PhineasC said:

Yeah, it has a lot of mice in it right now. My kids call it the spooky barn. LOL

Could throw a couple of shindigs in that barn :lol:

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1 minute ago, Dan76 said:

Could throw a couple of shindigs in that barn :lol:

It has a room upstairs that was finished with drywall and everything for "parties." It also has stables for horses and storage for feed and a water source.

I really have no idea what to do with the thing yet. The locals have lots of ideas they have all shared with me, ranging from storing snowmobiles, to plow maintenance, to raising livestock. 

I am still considering my options. LOL

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13 minutes ago, Dan76 said:

Would kill for something like that........never see the wife again! lol

I do spend a lot of time out there tuning up the chainsaw and organizing tools and so forth. I can see the appeal for sure. I need to decide which enormously time-consuming hobby I will take on and then go with it. 

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On 9/24/2020 at 11:33 AM, BrianW said:

Compressed wood blocks work great to add if your wood is a little wet or questionable. On really cold nights a load of these will burn hot for an incredibly long time. You have to be careful as these things can literally melt your stove. The more popular brand biobricks are actually made in CT. 

If your buying firewood these are similarly priced to a cord but 1lb equals 1.7 in firewood. No need to worry about moisture content/insects and they can be stored inside.

original_bio_2.jpg

Interesting I may have to purchase a few of them to see how they burn in my 1970s behemoth. This beast cranks out some serious BTUs. 

 

140440642291.jpg

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On 10/13/2020 at 3:05 PM, PowderBeard said:

Tons of elm and dead elm around here. Thinking American Chestnut?

 

Pretty cool convert. Speaking of elm and drum stoves. A buddy of mine has one of these. Only made for a few years (the guy built an amazing stove but the cost of EPA testing is insanely expensive and he was eventually bought out). The bigger model was made to take up to 30" pieces. 

Elm stove makeup air.MOV - YouTube

 

Wow that's a cool stove...

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37 minutes ago, subdude said:

Interesting I may have to purchase a few of them to see how they burn in my 1970s behemoth. This beast cranks out some serious BTUs. 

 

140440642291.jpg

Handsome Jotul 118.  We had one, black, in Gardiner and we liked it especially as it would take wood 24"+ so would hold a lot in one stoking.  Never saw one before with the fancy feet.

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17 hours ago, subdude said:

Interesting I may have to purchase a few of them to see how they burn in my 1970s behemoth. This beast cranks out some serious BTUs. 

 

140440642291.jpg

My favorite stove in my favorite color. Looks like new. My wife's god parents live in the snow capital of CT above >1000' and have two of them (in green) in their 2000 sq foot home. House is never less than 80* and they are always in heavy sweaters. They are both over 90 so I guess it makes sense. 

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23 minutes ago, PowderBeard said:

My favorite stove in my favorite color. Looks like new. My wife's god parents live in the snow capital of CT above >1000' and have two of them (in green) in their 2000 sq foot home. House is never less than 80* and they are always in heavy sweaters. They are both over 90 so I guess it makes sense. 

Sounds like the kind of place where when I visit I spend most of the time outside on the patio with a beer no matter the weather. 

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On 11/12/2020 at 4:35 PM, tamarack said:

Handsome Jotul 118.  We had one, black, in Gardiner and we liked it especially as it would take wood 24"+ so would hold a lot in one stoking.  Never saw one before with the fancy feet.

The pic I uploaded was a stock photo from the internet. Below is the one I have. I like that it takes 24" logs. This unit heats my small home of 1050 sq ft to a comfortable 75. 

 

2020-11-16_10-23-49.jpg.7b893119d06e17b3a13f50c0300c14e4.jpg

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On 11/13/2020 at 9:21 AM, PowderBeard said:

My favorite stove in my favorite color. Looks like new. My wife's god parents live in the snow capital of CT above >1000' and have two of them (in green) in their 2000 sq foot home. House is never less than 80* and they are always in heavy sweaters. They are both over 90 so I guess it makes sense. 

When I purchased my home 5yrs ago that stove was a big selling point. 

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35 minutes ago, subdude said:

The pic I uploaded was a stock photo from the internet. Below is the one I have. I like that it takes 24" logs. This unit heats my small home of 1050 sq ft to a comfortable 75. 

 

2020-11-16_10-23-49.jpg.7b893119d06e17b3a13f50c0300c14e4.jpg

The 24" logs make a difference. I almost bought one about a month ago, someone was selling a black one that needed some sanding and repainting for $100. After seeing what else they were selling I kind of figured they might be a little tight on cash so I ended up messaging the seller with a few ads for them for how much they really go for (because even cracked ones were selling for >$800) and how sought after they are. There are a couple of articles and youtube videos of people driving hundreds of miles for them in barely useable condition. I hope they made some good money off it. 

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6 minutes ago, PowderBeard said:

The 24" logs make a difference. I almost bought one about a month ago, someone was selling a black one that needed some sanding and repainting for $100. After seeing what else they were selling I kind of figured they might be a little tight on cash so I ended up messaging the seller with a few ads for them for how much they really go for (because even cracked ones were selling for >$800) and how sought after they are. There are a couple of articles and youtube videos of people driving hundreds of miles for them in barely useable condition. I hope they made some good money off it. 

Good job informing the guy about the demand and price of these hopefully he did get more than what he was asking.  I thought about selling mine last year but decided not too. I was going to ask $800. Still have original manual for it. 

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Did some experimenting last night and guess I have been loading my stove wrong the past year. Packed one side of the stove with all 16" splits then the open side with small 4" chunks around 9pm. At 11pm it still looked full with secondaries going strong and the top around 500*. House was at 72* and the stove room was 80*. It  took an extra half hour for the stove to get up to temp because it was packed so tightly but I must have got a few extra hours of burn out of it. House temp did not drop as much as usual, 67* when I woke up and the stove was still ~200*  at 6:30 this morning. 

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5 hours ago, PowderBeard said:

Did some experimenting last night and guess I have been loading my stove wrong the past year. Packed one side of the stove with all 16" splits then the open side with small 4" chunks around 9pm. At 11pm it still looked full with secondaries going strong and the top around 500*. House was at 72* and the stove room was 80*. It  took an extra half hour for the stove to get up to temp because it was packed so tightly but I must have got a few extra hours of burn out of it. House temp did not drop as much as usual, 67* when I woke up and the stove was still ~200*  at 6:30 this morning. 

wow you really bring wood burning down to a science! 

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