• Member Statistics

    16,116
    Total Members
    7,904
    Most Online
    Irish
    Newest Member
    Irish
    Joined
Sign in to follow this  
PhineasC

New England Firewood and Wood-Burning Thread

Recommended Posts

Seemed like a relevant topic for this forum. I'm sure there are some very dedicated and legendary firewood hoarders here who have massive stashes organized by age and wood type. LOL

Here is a chance for you to show off your dead wood collection and not be judged and taken for a weirdo prepper.

I am working towards having 4 cords stashed to rotate each winter. I have been taking down old, dead white ash mostly.

IMG_4266.thumb.jpg.358f92a6a23a4138f77e28b672149e88.jpg

 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
  • Weenie 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, DavisStraight said:

Ash is my favorite firewood these days, its dead and dries quickly, I have 6 1/2 cords, I usally have 12 cords for a three year supply, I'll try and take a pic tomorrow. What stove do you have? I have a Woodstock Progress Hybrid, awesome stove, both reburn and catalytic.

 

https://www.woodstove.com/index.php/progress-hybrid

I just have a standard fireplace here so far. As well as a pellet stove in the basement. 

  • Haha 1
  • Confused 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, PhineasC said:

I just have a standard fireplace here so far. As well as a pellet stove in the basement. 

You should get a wood stove or insert installed in the fireplace. 

A traditional fireplace only converts about 20% of its fuel into usable heat, with some older fireplaces being as low as 5-10%.  The closed combustion system of a fireplace insert can be 60-80% efficient.

They also burn extremely clean and use substantially less wood as well. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, PhineasC said:

Yeah, I know. We wanted to get through one winter here in Randolph and then see what we'd like.

I have a free stander in the front of my fireplace because its big, what size is your fireplace? The bigger the more options you have,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome thread. Looking forward to learning some things lol. It looks like an insert is something I should consider someday when I have a house. I’m in a more suburban area so stacking wood isn’t really an option. I’d be looking for efficiency without losing the wood burning aspect. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, DavisStraight said:

I have a free stander in the front of my fireplace because its big, what size is your fireplace? The bigger the more options you have,

Not exactly sure which dimension is most critical when measuring such things, but the fireplace opening is 43 inches wide, 35 inches high. It's bigger than my fireplace in MD,.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a regular ambiance fireplace, but want to get an insert so we can lower our oil usage. I hate the smell of burning oil, I'm just not sure what I want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, PhineasC said:

Not exactly sure which dimension is most critical when measuring such things, but the fireplace opening is 43 inches wide, 35 inches high. It's bigger than my fireplace in MD,.

Big enough to put  free stander instead of an insert, you get much more heat from a free stander than an insert and you don't have to rely on electric for the fan for an insert. I heat 2800 sf with my stove, use one tank of oil a year and that's mostly for my hot water.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, amarshall said:

Can someone educate me on the insert.  I have a regular fireplace I use a lot. 

The idea is your sealing off the traditional open firebox that we've grown accustomed to growing up with one that has a sealed combustion chamber.  They will burn more efficiently and give off more heat thus your burn less wood for the same return.  Some also have a blower which will direct the heat outwards into the space.

Any new wood burning fireplace we show on any of our new construction plans have to have a sealed combustion chamber due to the energy codes and how we have to limit air loss to the outside..

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use our fire place quite a bit and looked into an insert. Just not sure I would use it enough to have that as a significant source of heat. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome thread idea. I'm an absolute firewood hoarder. Love finding what the town and power companies have dropped on town land. I'm typically able to scrounge up about 3-4 cords per year with minimal work (except for all the splitting by hand). This year I have about 5 cords of oak, maple, and elm for the colder times and half a cord pine for "shoulder season."  Moisture meter says it is all at 14-18% and good to go. I grabbed a bunch of super cedar type fire starters for this year. The up and down temps last me had me constantly starting the stove from scratch and spent way too much time dealing with kindling. So far they seem pretty great.

1 hour ago, amarshall said:

Can someone educate me on the insert.  I have a regular fireplace I use a lot. 

Fireplace inserts take your fireplace (10-20% heating efficiency) and make them comparable to a wood stove (65-80%). 

9 hours ago, PhineasC said:

Not exactly sure which dimension is most critical when measuring such things, but the fireplace opening is 43 inches wide, 35 inches high. It's bigger than my fireplace in MD,.

That's big and you could fit a large stove in there. I would be more concerned about the dimensions and layout of your home in terms of moving the heat around. We have a large stove (capable of heating 2000 square feet and the upstairs part of our home is only about 1500) but it is in a backroom and have to use multiple fans and the fan from the forced air system to push the air around.

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, PowderBeard said:

 

That's big and you could fit a large stove in there. I would be more concerned about the dimensions and layout of your home in terms of moving the heat around. We have a large stove (capable of heating 2000 square feet and the upstairs part of our home is only about 1500) but it is in a backroom and have to use multiple fans and the fan from the forced air system to push the air around.

 

 

It's in the great room. One issue is that that space has high ceilings and the air in there tends to sometimes feel closed off from the rest of the house. My fireplace makes it nice and cozy in there despite the large volume, but the adjacent rooms get nothing, for example. I have a feeling a grand wood insert with a blower would roast that room and not do much for the other rooms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My parents had a wood stove in the basement of the house I grew up in and we burned about 4-5 cords of wood every winter.  I had a wood stove in my first house, and burned about 2 cords every winter. 

When it was time to put in a back-up heating system in my current home, I went with a natural gas insert for my fireplace.  Was originally planning for a wood insert, but the wife flat out refused to feed it if needed, and the cost of wood pellets in my area is the same per BTU as natural gas. 

So the wood I cut from my lot is use in the fire pit in the back yard, and given away to neighbors for their fire pits.  

wooddd.thumb.jpg.c86e51ca66c72c805a6172d282f5ecea.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Brewbeer said:

My parents had a wood stove in the basement of the house I grew up in and we burned about 4-5 cords of wood every winter.  I had a wood stove in my first house, and burned about 2 cords every winter. 

When it was time to put in a back-up heating system in my current home, I went with a natural gas insert for my fireplace.  Was originally planning for a wood insert, but the wife flat out refused to feed it if needed, and the cost of wood pellets in my area is the same per BTU as natural gas. 

So the wood I cut from my lot is use in the fire pit in the back yard, and given away to neighbors for their fire pits.  

wooddd.thumb.jpg.c86e51ca66c72c805a6172d282f5ecea.jpg

I enjoy taking down old trees and splitting wood so I'd probably do the same thing even if I didn't have a fireplace.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Brewbeer said:

My parents had a wood stove in the basement of the house I grew up in and we burned about 4-5 cords of wood every winter.  I had a wood stove in my first house, and burned about 2 cords every winter. 

When it was time to put in a back-up heating system in my current home, I went with a natural gas insert for my fireplace.  Was originally planning for a wood insert, but the wife flat out refused to feed it if needed, and the cost of wood pellets in my area is the same per BTU as natural gas. 

So the wood I cut from my lot is use in the fire pit in the back yard, and given away to neighbors for their fire pits.  

wooddd.thumb.jpg.c86e51ca66c72c805a6172d282f5ecea.jpg

Ah crib stacking. We have a lot of area to stack wood so I stack all mine like lincoln logs. The difference in drying time is pretty wild. I can get 18" red oak splits <20% in about 14 months (16 tops) vs. traditional 2-3 splits wide taking ~2 years+. All about that air flow.

 

My 2021-2022 stacks drying in a windy open space. 4-5' high, 3 pallets wide and 2 deep so far of all red oak and black birch.

No description available.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone know anything about stove paint? We have friends put in a new soapstone stove two years ago and they just gave us (yup, amazing folks) their 15 year old Jotul - no cats but great secondary burn tubes. This area was once occupied by a TV but ye old man @MBRI and I turned it into this. All the stone and materials cost about $300, the double walled chimney we installed, thimble, etc was ~$900 (given half the house is electric it paid for itself in less than a winter). I just really want to make the stove a nice black again to go with the stone. The aged color of it irritates me a bit - and the damn stickers are impossible to get off without scratching the single wall pipe. 

119905491_1033073780472331_4185975342365260849_n.jpg?_nc_cat=111&_nc_sid=b96e70&_nc_ohc=Gpi_gwuUAFUAX8FDoYV&_nc_ht=scontent-iad3-1.xx&oh=4352b03dff9ea379063a4a1a641d3892&oe=5F8E853F

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, PowderBeard said:

Awesome thread idea. I'm an absolute firewood hoarder. Love finding what the town and power companies have dropped on town land. I'm typically able to scrounge up about 3-4 cords per year with minimal work (except for all the splitting by hand). This year I have about 5 cords of oak, maple, and elm for the colder times and half a cord pine for "shoulder season."  Moisture meter says it is all at 14-18% and good to go. I grabbed a bunch of super cedar type fire starters for this year. The up and down temps last me had me constantly starting the stove from scratch and spent way too much time dealing with kindling. So far they seem pretty great.

Fireplace inserts take your fireplace (10-20% heating efficiency) and make them comparable to a wood stove (65-80%). 

That's big and you could fit a large stove in there. I would be more concerned about the dimensions and layout of your home in terms of moving the heat around. We have a large stove (capable of heating 2000 square feet and the upstairs part of our home is only about 1500) but it is in a backroom and have to use multiple fans and the fan from the forced air system to push the air around.

 

 

You just reminded me to order a box of super cedars, best fire starters out there, I crib stack too and get my wood 20% and under in a year too. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, PowderBeard said:

Anyone know anything about stove paint? We have friends put in a new soapstone stove two years ago and they just gave us (yup, amazing folks) their 15 year old Jotul - no cats but great secondary burn tubes. This area was once occupied by a TV but ye old man @MBRI and I turned it into this. All the stone and materials cost about $300, the double walled chimney we installed, thimble, etc was ~$900 (given half the house is electric it paid for itself in less than a winter). I just really want to make the stove a nice black again to go with the stone. The aged color of it irritates me a bit - and the damn stickers are impossible to get off without scratching the single wall pipe. 

119905491_1033073780472331_4185975342365260849_n.jpg?_nc_cat=111&_nc_sid=b96e70&_nc_ohc=Gpi_gwuUAFUAX8FDoYV&_nc_ht=scontent-iad3-1.xx&oh=4352b03dff9ea379063a4a1a641d3892&oe=5F8E853F

Stove Bright

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, DavisStraight said:

You just reminded me to order a box of super cedars, best fire starters out there, I crib stack too and get my wood 20% and under in a year too. 

Yup, pretty funny to see people complaining on firewood/woodstove forums about oak taking 3 years to dry and not worth it. Best wood around but I never let it get below 12%, then it is just scary. I put some oak in that was around 10%, air vent completely shut, and watched the stove top climb over 700*. It spooked me a bit and I learned wood can be too dry. 

 

Thanks about the stove bright! I'll check it out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I burn wood in my fire pot all summer long but i only use hardwood, It saves on clothing, Also i had built a wood box that holds a cord of wood, I buy a seasoned cord every year.

2C193B44-DC1F-4C3A-BC87-539E73A2E98E.jpeg

51C7BAF2-0988-4C62-8E8D-4C2A1F5C296C.jpeg

EE395264-8EB1-4027-8C20-6D35B388E4D1.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, PhineasC said:

It's in the great room. One issue is that that space has high ceilings and the air in there tends to sometimes feel closed off from the rest of the house. My fireplace makes it nice and cozy in there despite the large volume, but the adjacent rooms get nothing, for example. I have a feeling a grand wood insert with a blower would roast that room and not do much for the other rooms.

Do you have a fan in the ceiling of the great room? 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, PhineasC said:

It's in the great room. One issue is that that space has high ceilings and the air in there tends to sometimes feel closed off from the rest of the house. My fireplace makes it nice and cozy in there despite the large volume, but the adjacent rooms get nothing, for example. I have a feeling a grand wood insert with a blower would roast that room and not do much for the other rooms.

This is a challenging scenario, to get the heat out of the great room and into the rest of the house, especially with it set up having high ceilings and limited connection to the rest of the home.  Initial thought is to get a decorative pellet stove for the great room, and get a wood stove for the basement.   Pellet stoves are a bit easier to control especially if you have more of the modern ones, some of which can even be hooked up to a thermostat, that will help keep it from over heating the space. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Brewbeer said:

This is a challenging scenario, to get the heat out of the great room and into the rest of the house, especially with it set up having high ceilings and limited connection to the rest of the home.  Initial thought is to get a decorative pellet stove for the great room, and get a wood stove for the basement.   Pellet stoves are a bit easier to control especially if you have more of the modern ones, some of which can even be hooked up to a thermostat, that will help keep it from over heating the space. 

I have a pellet insert in the basement fireplace already. It's great down there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.