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WxWatcher007

Hurricane Hanna

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No minimum extrapolated pressure this pass, but the last one was 972.6 and was 5 observations before the calmest wind. Maybe a drop of ~2mb? We'll have to wait for the dropsonde.

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Dropsonde in the SE eyewall. Look at the wind just off the deck. 

 

Product: Air Force Temp Drop (Dropsonde) Message (UZNT13 KNHC)
Transmitted: 25th day of the month at 19:34Z
Agency: United States Air Force
Aircraft: Lockheed WC-130J Hercules with reg. number AF98-5307
Storm Number: 08
Storm Name: Hanna (flight in the North Atlantic basin)
Mission Number: 7
Observation Number: 16 ( See all messages of this type for this mission. )

Part A...
 

Date: Near the closest hour of 19Z on the 25th day of the month
Highest Mandatory Level For Which Wind Was Reported: 700mb
Coordinates: 26.7N 96.8W
Location: 68 statute miles (110 km) to the NE (39°) from Brownsville, TX, USA.
Marsden Square: 082 ( About )
 
Surface and Standard Isobaric Surfaces
Level Geo. Height Air Temp. Dew Point Wind Direction Wind Speed
1000mb -137m (-449 ft) This level does not exist in this area of the storm above the surface level.
985mb (29.09 inHg) Surface (Sea Level) 25.4°C (77.7°F) 24.0°C (75°F) 160° (from the SSE) 65 knots (75 mph)
925mb 548m (1,798 ft) 21.4°C (70.5°F) 20.5°C (69°F) 185° (from the S) 110 knots (127 mph)
850mb 1,280m (4,199 ft) 18.4°C (65.1°F) 17.7°C (64°F) 210° (from the SSW) 87 knots (100 mph)
700mb 2,938m (9,639 ft) 13.6°C (56.5°F) 12.9°C (55°F) 225° (from the SW) 40 knots (46 mph)

Information About Radiosonde:
- Launch Time: 19:15Z
- About Sonde: A descending radiosonde tracked automatically by satellite navigation with no solar or infrared correction.

Remarks Section...
 
Dropsonde Location: Dropped in eyewall 135° (SE) from the eye center.

Highest altitude where wind was reported:
- Location: 26.66N 96.75W
- Time: 19:14:59Z

Lowest altitude where wind was reported:
- Location: 26.74N 96.70W
- Time: 19:19:37Z

Mean Boundary Level Wind (mean wind in the lowest 500 geopotential meters of the sounding):
- Wind Direction: 175° (from the S)
- Wind Speed: 98 knots (113 mph)

Deep Layer Mean Wind (average wind over the depth of the sounding):
- Wind Direction: 205° (from the SSW)
- Wind Speed: 77 knots (89 mph)
- Depth of Sounding: From 696mb to 984mb

Average Wind Over Lowest Available 150 geopotential meters (gpm) of the sounding:
- Lowest 150m: 159 gpm - 9 gpm (522 geo. feet - 30 geo. feet)
- Wind Direction: 170° (from the S)
- Wind Speed: 82 knots (94 mph)

Sounding Software Version: AEV 30400
 

Part B: Data for Significant Levels...
 

Significant Temperature And Relative Humidity Levels
Level Air Temperature Dew Point
985mb (Surface) 25.4°C (77.7°F) 24.0°C (75°F)
956mb 22.8°C (73.0°F) 22.0°C (72°F)
850mb 18.4°C (65.1°F) 17.7°C (64°F)
742mb 15.8°C (60.4°F) 14.3°C (58°F)
702mb 13.0°C (55.4°F) 12.3°C (54°F)
696mb Unavailable
 
Significant Wind Levels
Level Wind Direction Wind Speed
985mb (Surface) 160° (from the SSE) 65 knots (75 mph)
977mb 165° (from the SSE) 81 knots (93 mph)
971mb 170° (from the S) 88 knots (101 mph)
965mb 175° (from the S) 104 knots (120 mph)
953mb 175° (from the S) 108 knots (124 mph)
939mb 185° (from the S) 105 knots (121 mph)
926mb 185° (from the S) 111 knots (128 mph)
919mb 190° (from the S) 104 knots (120 mph)
899mb 200° (from the SSW) 112 knots (129 mph)
884mb 205° (from the SSW) 104 knots (120 mph)
874mb 205° (from the SSW) 106 knots (122 mph)
865mb 205° (from the SSW) 97 knots (112 mph)
858mb 205° (from the SSW) 100 knots (115 mph)
850mb 210° (from the SSW) 87 knots (100 mph)
763mb 245° (from the WSW) 62 knots (71 mph)
733mb 225° (from the SW) 48 knots (55 mph)
696mb 225° (from the SW) 40 knots (46 mph)
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Hanna is also crawling at 6 kts. Hopefully it gains some forward motion once it moves into S Texas. As is typical of slow moving TCs, flooding usually ends up being the biggest story. This could put down some dangerous totals in the Rio Grand Valley.

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Just now, Windspeed said:

Hanna is also crawling at 6 kts. Hopefully it gains some forward motion once it moves into S. Texas. As is typical of slow moving TCs, flooding usually ends up being the biggest story. This could put down some dangerous totals in the Rio Grand Valley.

Thankfully it moved far enough south to lessen impacts in the CC area and much of the initial brunt goes into sparsely populated Kennedy County, this is going to cause impacts in the Lower Rio Grande due to its trajectory, where they honestly already have enough problems at the moment.

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No upgrade at 4pm EST but the winds are definitely becoming more impressive. 

Hurricane Hanna Tropical Cyclone Update
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL       AL082020
300 PM CDT Sat Jul 25 2020

...WESTERN EYEWALL OF HANNA BRINGING HURRICANE CONDITIONS TO THE 
COAST OF TEXAS...

A TCOON observing station at Laguna Madre, Texas, recently reported 
a sustained wind of 68 mph (109 km/h) and a gust to 104 mph (167 
km/h).

NOAA buoy 42020 recently measured a gust to 87 mph (141 km/h) at a 
height of 12 ft (3.7 m) in the eastern eyewall of Hanna.

The most recent observations from an Air Force Reserve 
reconnaissance aircraft indicate that the minimum central pressure 
inside the eye of Hanna is 973 mb (28.73 inches).

SUMMARY OF 300 PM CDT...2000 UTC...INFORMATION
----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...26.8N 97.0W
ABOUT 30 MI...50 KM ENE OF PORT MANSFIELD TEXAS
ABOUT 75 MI...120 KM SSE OF CORPUS CHRISTI TEXAS
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...85 MPH...140 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...W OR 260 DEGREES AT 8 MPH...13 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...973 MB...28.73 INCHES

$$
Forecaster Zelinsky

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13 minutes ago, dan11295 said:

Thankfully it moved far enough south to lessen impacts in the CC area and much of the initial brunt goes into sparsely populated Kennedy County, this is going to cause impacts in the Lower Rio Grande due to its trajectory, where they honestly already have enough problems at the moment.

Great for CC that the core has dipped SW, still, as far as flood threat, can't place them in the clear yet. We've seen boundaries / rainbands setup off the WGOM before against blocking heights well away from a decaying vortex. Often times these bands can build their own multi-cellular train rides right over the same areas for hours on end. Harvey comes to mind, though not saying this will be anything that extreme. Obviously the core moving at a snail's pace is going to do bad things regardless over the RGV. Again, just have to watch for those separate bands and fetch off the Gulf.

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13 minutes ago, dan11295 said:

Thankfully it moved far enough south to lessen impacts in the CC area and much of the initial brunt goes into sparsely populated Kennedy County, this is going to cause impacts in the Lower Rio Grande due to its trajectory, where they honestly already have enough problems at the moment.

Similar spot to Brett in 1999...

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Just now, 40/70 Benchmark said:

Similar spot to Brett in 1999...

Bret was stronger at landfall but was a very small storm. Did minimal damage (~$15 million).

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484 
WTNT63 KNHC 251954
TCUAT3

Hurricane Hanna Tropical Cyclone Update
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL       AL082020
300 PM CDT Sat Jul 25 2020

...WESTERN EYEWALL OF HANNA BRINGING HURRICANE CONDITIONS TO THE 
COAST OF TEXAS...

A TCOON observing station at Laguna Madre, Texas, recently reported 
a sustained wind of 68 mph (109 km/h) and a gust to 104 mph (167 
km/h).

NOAA buoy 42020 recently measured a gust to 87 mph (141 km/h) at a 
height of 12 ft (3.7 m) in the eastern eyewall of Hanna.

The most recent observations from an Air Force Reserve 
reconnaissance aircraft indicate that the minimum central pressure 
inside the eye of Hanna is 973 mb (28.73 inches).

SUMMARY OF 300 PM CDT...2000 UTC...INFORMATION
----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...26.8N 97.0W
ABOUT 30 MI...50 KM ENE OF PORT MANSFIELD TEXAS
ABOUT 75 MI...120 KM SSE OF CORPUS CHRISTI TEXAS
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...85 MPH...140 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...W OR 260 DEGREES AT 8 MPH...13 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...973 MB...28.73 INCHES

$$
Forecaster Zelinsky

 

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The eyewall looks to have completely closed on radar. Dry slot to the north earlier is gone. The northern wall has also really increased in coverage with a thick band of ~30 DBZ echoes. Obviously the back side (SE and E eyewall) still looks the most intense.

hanna_4.png

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Hanna makes landfall...

 

Quote
The eye of Hurricane Hanna made landfall on Padre Island, Texas, at 
500 PM CDT (2200 UTC) about 15 miles (20 km) north of Port 
Mansfield, Texas, with maximum sustained winds of 90 mph (150 km/h).

A TCOON observing station at Ricon del San Juan, Texas, recently 
reported a sustained wind of 60 mph (96 km/h) and a gust to 74 mph 
(119 km/h).

NOAA buoy 42020 recently reported a sustained wind of 60 mph (96 
km/h) a gust to 69 mph (111 km/h) at a height of 12 ft (3.7 m).


SUMMARY OF 500 PM CDT...2200 UTC...INFORMATION

https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/text/refresh/MIATCUAT3+shtml/252157.shtml

 

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3 minutes ago, CoastalWx said:

Intensifying storms always do a bit worse than some think. It will be interesting to see some footage from this.

That flooding near downtown Corpus was impressive considering a Cat 1 hurricane.

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6 minutes ago, CoastalWx said:

Intensifying storms always do a bit worse than some think. It will be interesting to see some footage from this.

The best example I remember for some reason is Katrina. Florida was hit much harder than they expected and Katrina rolled on into a monster in the Gulf.

2 minutes ago, Floydbuster said:

That flooding near downtown Corpus was impressive considering a Cat 1 hurricane.

You made a great call. I thought the potential was there, but definitely hesitated. You were on it from the start. 

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3 minutes ago, WxWatcher007 said:

The best example I remember for some reason is Katrina. Florida was hit much harder than they expected and Katrina rolled on into a monster in the Gulf.

You made a great call. I thought the potential was there, but definitely hesitated. You were on it from the start. 


What's funny is I don't forecast things often, but I had a feeling. That upper level environment was just too impressive and the waters are just too damn hot. I really think we are in for a prolific hurricane season this year.

If anything, the northwest side being impinged on, the northerly shear, and the lack of an inner core made it under perform. Hanna could well have been a major hurricane. 

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2 minutes ago, Floydbuster said:


What's funny is I don't forecast things often, but I had a feeling. That upper level environment was just too impressive and the waters are just too damn hot. I really think we are in for a prolific hurricane season this year.

If anything, the northwest side being impinged on, the northerly shear, and the lack of an inner core made it under perform. Hanna could well have been a major hurricane. 

The environment was great. We were really lucky there wasn't more time, or that Hanna didn't really get going 48 hours prior. That morning burst on Thursday almost got it over the hump. 

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1 minute ago, WxWatcher007 said:

The environment was great. We were really lucky there wasn't more time, or that Hanna didn't really get going 48 hours prior. That morning burst on Thursday almost got it over the hump. 

Now all eyes turn to Invest 92L. Likely Isaias. 

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Just now, Floydbuster said:

Now all eyes turn to Invest 92L. Likely Isaias. 

Not mine eyes. We still have most intense region of this particular hurricane's eyewall to come ashore. :weenie:

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