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Coronavirus

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2 hours ago, powderfreak said:

Good luck with the move.  I know your heart is in VT more than anywhere else.  

And I wasn’t trying to call you out in anyway, just trying to give what seems to be the prevailing thought up here...the pick a place and stay there, but like Backedge said, some of these folks seem to be inviting a bunch of people to their second homes (where you’ll see like 3-4 cars outside) and then they move around a lot up here once they arrive.  

But life is so very different and fast paced in a lot of the more populated and suburban areas.  Like they really struggle with just not doing anything, its not an option for some folks....they are busy beavers and need to keep moving and keep busy.  They do it where I grew up, it would be next to impossible for the people in the suburbs where I grew up to just watch Netflix for a day or two, much less weeks.  They have a daily planner that HAS to be full at all times.  It’s just a different fast paced lifestyle.    And if that planner is empty, well then they better travel and go somewhere else to do things.

Sad life for them yikes

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Just now, Ginx snewx said:

Sad life for them yikes

He who despises his neighbor lacks sense, But a man of understanding keeps silent. 

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Tip - physical distancing does work.  It worked in several Asian countries in conjunction with widespread testing.  It has also decreased the rate of transmission in Italy and Spain.  And it is now also correlated to a decrease in the increase of infections and hospitalizations in NY and NJ.  But people have to practice it diligently.  Everywhere I look, people are clustering in groups and standing too close together.

But yes, we have massively under-tested, there are many non-counted COVID cases out there, and it has been spreading in the US at least since early February and probably earlier.

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1 hour ago, powderfreak said:

Didn't they go full lockdown?   They closed off interstates and big freeways to limit movement.

Posted yesterday from a friend in Seattle... they said it's like a deserted city.

Looks like something out a movie with no cars.

I'm guessing the Mass Pike or 93 in Boston doesn't look like that, haha.

 

Untitled.jpg.e293b3107a3cb9dc7020573268392548.jpg

Based on a review of live webcams that’s an altered image.

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58 minutes ago, ORH_wxman said:

Yeah that’s a good recommendation but it is still just that. They “urge” people. That said, even if the states banned non-essential travel across state lines, it doesn’t mean shit. You can’t really enforce that very well. What are they going to do, set up a road block and ask all 30 to 50 thousand commuters from New Hampshire why they are traveling across state lines? 

I agree.  This is where you have to educate the public, provide information, remind people when they cross street borders vis-à-vis electronic signs, and then depend on social pressure to do the right thing. Ultimately we have to all assume that we’re all infected and behave accordingly.  We do live in a free country 

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2 hours ago, powderfreak said:

Good luck with the move.  I know your heart is in VT more than anywhere else.  

And I wasn’t trying to call you out in anyway, just trying to give what seems to be the prevailing thought up here...the pick a place and stay there, but like Backedge said, some of these folks seem to be inviting a bunch of people to their second homes (where you’ll see like 3-4 cars outside) and then they move around a lot up here once they arrive.  

But life is so very different and fast paced in a lot of the more populated and suburban areas.  Like they really struggle with just not doing anything, its not an option for some folks....they are busy beavers and need to keep moving and keep busy.  They do it where I grew up, it would be next to impossible for the people in the suburbs where I grew up to just watch Netflix for a day or two, much less weeks.  They have a daily planner that HAS to be full at all times.  It’s just a different fast paced lifestyle.    And if that planner is empty, well then they better travel and go somewhere else to do things.

Admittedly I’m coming at this from the perspective of someone leaving and going to work every day bit Pirone family hasn’t achieved this level of serenity in a long time.  My daughter is doing college on line.  My wife has time to develop some incredible dinners.  All are walking although work makes it less so for me.  The thing I miss the most is the inability to browse in a bookstore or library.

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29 minutes ago, OSUmetstud said:

I cant seem to find the meme of martial law vs. marshal law vs. marshall law vs. marital law lol...

 

 

Google Marco Rubio 

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What would it take to test everyone?  I keep hearing that we can only test symptomatic people with known COVID contacts.  In the business world, "we can't" is not good enough.  What do we need to do to get there?.. to first increase testing capacity by one order of magnitude... then two... etc...

If China and South Korea can massively increase testing in a short time period, why can't the wealthiest nation in the world with a huge research, university, and medical infrastructure not accomplish this task?

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Just now, eduggs said:

What would it take to test everyone?  I keep hearing that we can only test symptomatic people with known COVID contacts.  In the business world, "we can't" is not good enough.  What do we need to do to get there?.. to first increase testing capacity by one order of magnitude... then two... etc...

If China and South Korea can massively increase testing in a short time period, why can't the wealthiest nation in the world with a huge research, university, and medical infrastructure not accomplish this task?

We are the richest but not the smartest. 

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Just now, HimoorWx said:

This is Marshall law.17dc4241ee3d1882e885b3d1bd73544f.jpg

Sent from my SM-T510 using Tapatalk
 

Mr. Dillon!

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13 minutes ago, eduggs said:

Tip - physical distancing does work.  It worked in several Asian countries in conjunction with widespread testing.  It has also decreased the rate of transmission in Italy and Spain.  And it is now also correlated to a decrease in the increase of infections and hospitalizations in NY and NJ.  But people have to practice it diligently.  Everywhere I look, people are clustering in groups and standing too close together.

But yes, we have massively under-tested, there are many non-counted COVID cases out there, and it has been spreading in the US at least since early February and probably earlier.

Yes .. and if so, why are we not seeing results in the U.S. ? 

I'm not asking you per se or the question - it's rhetorical in nature, trying to lead folks into the 'possibility' that what the present statistical behavior is reflecting is less 'spreading,' perhaps more so where it already is -

I think that 'could be' an important distinction, because I actually foresee this as non-sustainable, what the gov and society is asking of itself, and people will eventually revolt if they do not see results ... That distinction - if proven true - needs to be conveyed, so people understand that it may actually BE working, just sort of invisibly lost in the in situ detection - otherwise, these measures collapse given time.

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Just now, eduggs said:

What would it take to test everyone?  I keep hearing that we can only test symptomatic people with known COVID contacts.  In the business world, "we can't" is not good enough.  What do we need to do to get there?.. to first increase testing capacity by one order of magnitude... then two... etc...

If China and South Korea can massively increase testing in a short time period, why can't the wealthiest nation in the world with a huge research, university, and medical infrastructure not accomplish this task?

If we did test everyone, we would find out that a massive amount of people have this. In Iceland they tested a large part of their population, and found that 50% of people that tested positive had no symptoms at all. That's amazing. For so many people Coronavirus is so mild that they get no symptoms at all. And these people end up spreading it to people with underlying health conditions that are much more likely to develop severe and dangerous disease.

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3 minutes ago, HimoorWx said:

Gary Cooper in High Noon.

Sent from my SM-T510 using Tapatalk
 

Lol...no wonder I couldn’t find that image under gunsmoke...

 

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3 minutes ago, winterwx21 said:

If we did test everyone, we would find out that a massive amount of people have this. In Iceland they tested a large part of their population, and found that 50% of people that tested positive had no symptoms at all. That's amazing. For so many people Coronavirus is so mild that they get no symptoms at all. And these people end up spreading it to people with underlying health conditions that are much more likely to develop severe and dangerous disease.

You have it wrong.  They spread it to people some of which with underlying conditions and others perfectly healthy who die.  Of course older people are more vulnerable-to the virus and many other conditions.  Medicine isn’t black and white.

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7 minutes ago, Typhoon Tip said:

Yes .. and if so, why are we not seeing results in the U.S. ? 

I'm not asking you per se or the question - it's rhetorical in nature, trying to lead folks into the 'possibility' that what the present statistical behavior is reflecting is less 'spreading,' perhaps more so where it already is -

I think that 'could be' an important distinction, because I actually foresee this as non-sustainable, what the gov and society is asking of itself, and people will eventually revolt if they do not see results ... That distinction - if proven true - needs to be conveyed, so people understand that it may actually BE working, just sort of invisibly lost in the in situ detection - otherwise, these measures collapse given time.

It’s been happening for 2 weeks-not enough time.  Are you aware of the St. Louis vs Philadelphia episodes during 1918?  Philly let a parade happen and their caseload and mortality sky rocketed.  St. Louis cancelled public gatherings and the curve clearly flattened.

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10 minutes ago, weathafella said:

You have it wrong.  They spread it to people some of which with underlying conditions and others perfectly healthy who die.  Of course older people are more vulnerable-to the virus and many other conditions.  Medicine isn’t black and white.

a great example is the multiple outbreaks in nursing home/rehab facilities.

the majority of the time, those people aren't leaving. Asymptomatic (or slightly symptomatic who don't want to call out for a variety of reasons) employees and family members are bringing it in. 

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9 minutes ago, weathafella said:

It’s been happening for 2 weeks-not enough time.  Are you aware of the St. Louis vs Philadelphia episodes during 1918?  Philly let a parade happen and their caseload and mortality sky rocketed.  St. Louis cancelled public gatherings and the curve clearly flattened.

the average incubation period has been 5 days, with systemic resolution in 5 more...  There are cases that took 14 days to present; at the other end, in as little as 2 days. But by and large, 2 weeks is enough time to register an acceleration - so..logic argues alone there's a hidden factor in 'where' these are coming from that extends beyond just 'spreading'.

 

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Just now, RUNNAWAYICEBERG said:

We are the richest but not the smartest. 

Clearly.  Our COVID response is by far the worst of any western democracy.  It may actually be the worst of any country in the world.  We did literally everything wrong.  And our federal leaders continue to do almost everything wrong.  Thank god we have governors to fill the void.

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1 minute ago, RUNNAWAYICEBERG said:

That's by total GDP, which makes no sense. If you have a trillion people each producing a dollar, that doesn't mean your trillion dollar GDP makes you a rich country. You have to look at per capita data 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_(PPP)_per capita

 

 

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2 minutes ago, alex said:

That's by total GDP, which makes no sense. If you have a trillion people each producing a dollar, that doesn't mean your trillion dollar GDP makes you a rich country. You have to look at per capita data 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_(PPP)_per capita

 

 

See the link. They list by capita first. 

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Just now, Typhoon Tip said:

Yes .. and if so, why are we not seeing results in the U.S. ? 

I'm not asking you per se or the question - it's rhetorical in nature, trying to lead folks into the 'possibility' that what the present statistical behavior is reflecting is less 'spreading,' perhaps more so where it already is -

I think that 'could be' an important distinction, because I actually foresee this as non-sustainable, what the gov and society is asking of itself, and people will eventually revolt if they do not see results ... That distinction - if proven true - needs to be conveyed, so people understand that it may actually BE working, just sort of invisibly lost in the in situ detection - otherwise, these measures collapse given time.

We are seeing results if you look closely at daily rates of infection and hospitalization locally in places like NYC.

But the reasons why the total numbers continue to rise in spite of physical distancing are as follows:

1) We are still testing-contrained.  That means the true case number is vastly underreported, and the statistics are playing catchup.

2) The virus incubation period is about 5 days on average with a lot of variation.  On top of that, it can take several days for symptoms to progress to the level where people seek medical attention.  And then another few days to get a test result.  So we're talking about a 1-2 week lag period in the data.

3) A lot of people still aren't taking this seriously enough.  Young people think they are invincible, and asymptomatic people think they aren't contageous.

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10 minutes ago, Typhoon Tip said:

the average incubation period has been 5 days, with systemic resolution in 5 more...  There are cases that took 14 days to present; at the other end, in as little as 2 days. But by and large, 2 weeks is enough time to register an acceleration - so..logic argues alone there's a hidden factor in 'where' these are coming from that extends beyond just 'spreading'.

 

John, 2 weeks isn’t enough time.  Cases are increasing exponentially but in places putting flatten curve guidance in a month ago it’s working such as Washington state.

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Just now, RUNNAWAYICEBERG said:

See the link. They list by capita first. 

Which shows the US at #7. Exactly my point. 

  1. Luxembourg (GDP per capita: $119,719)
  2. Norway (GDP per capita: $86,362)
  3. Switzerland (GDP per capita: $83,832)
  4. Ireland (GDP per capita: $81,477)
  5. Iceland (GDP per capita: $78,181)
  6. Qatar (GDP per capita: $65,062)
  7. The United States of America (GDP per capita: $64,906)
  8. Denmark (GDP per capita: $63,434)
  9. Singapore (GDP per capita: $62,690)
  10. Australia (GDP per capita: $58,824)

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12 minutes ago, Typhoon Tip said:

the average incubation period has been 5 days, with systemic resolution in 5 more...  There are cases that took 14 days to present; at the other end, in as little as 2 days. But by and large, 2 weeks is enough time to register an acceleration - so..logic argues alone there's a hidden factor in 'where' these are coming from that extends beyond just 'spreading'.

 

And lots of infected folks still rolling into nyc and out of nyc.

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