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WxWatcher007

Category Five Hurricane Dorian

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48 minutes ago, CoastalWx said:

It’s the intensifying storms that really pack a punch. So while it was a Cat 1, Katrina was intensifying which probably backs up Cantore’s thoughts. Intensifying hurricanes have winds accelerating towards pressure falls and also, the more violent updrafts helping to mix down stronger winds. A steady state cat 3 wouldn’t be a good thing for FL, but so much new construction can withstand cat 3 winds. It’s really cat 4 and above where you’ll see a huge increase in structural damage.  I’d probably hedge cat 3 landfall for now as well. However hurricanes are guaranteed to humble us so I wouldn’t be surprised either way. 

The Miami-Dade building ode standard was stopped pre 2008 recession because of the builder lobby.  A lot of the newer stuff isn't as hurricane proof as you would think.  Brian Norcross described that well in his book.

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5 minutes ago, the ghost of leroy said:

You know how many times I have read this post over the last two days?

it will happen this time, i'm sure of it. 

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1 hour ago, mappy said:

I really think this thread can do without comparing to past hurricanes in terms of damage. a lot has changed since 1992 with building codes, evac plans, etc. 

From the current Florida building code. I believe it was adopted in 2010, with the first changes coming in 2002. Obviously any structure built before then would not meet the latest standard.

Below is the 3 second max wind gust. Theoretically almost all of the Southern and Central coastal FL can handle up to a CAT 4 storm, however a landfalling CAT 5, given that it would contain higher gusts would certainly be an issue. 

Map of wind gusts used in Florida Building Code

https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/South-Floridas-Hurricane-Building-Code-StrongAnd-North-Floridas-Could-Be-Stronger

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2 minutes ago, JakkelWx said:

Maybe you should step away from the keyboard for a little while.

OR instead of asking one of the better known tropical posters to go away, we curb down the uninformative posts. maybe? 

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6 minutes ago, the ghost of leroy said:

You know how many times I have read this post over the last two days?

It's pretty obvious an eye is starting to clear on the visible satellite. 

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Just now, NJwx85 said:

From the current Florida building code. I believe it was adopted in 2010, with the first changes coming in 2002. Obviously any structure built before then would not meet the latest standard.

Below is the 3 second max wind gust. Theoretically almost all of the Southern and Central coastal FL can handle up to a CAT 4 storm, however a landfalling CAT 5, given that it would contain higher gusts would certainly be an issue. 

Map of wind gusts used in Florida Building Code

https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/South-Floridas-Hurricane-Building-Code-StrongAnd-North-Floridas-Could-Be-Stronger

i dont care. stop comparing it to every other major hurricane to ever hit the coast of florida. it just causes panic. 

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1 minute ago, mappy said:

OR instead of asking one of the better known tropical posters to go away, we curb down the uninformative posts. maybe? 

Yes. No problem.

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Just now, JakkelWx said:

Yes. No problem.

wasn't a shot at you ;) 

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1 minute ago, NJwx85 said:

How was I comparing this to other storms?

I'm just pointing out that a lot has changed with Florida building code since Andrew and largely because of Andrew. 

you weren't. others have been and honestly as Ray said, it really shouldn't be happening. if some of yall wanna discuss it, take it to banter. 

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7 minutes ago, NJwx85 said:

From the current Florida building code. I believe it was adopted in 2010, with the first changes coming in 2002. Obviously any structure built before then would not meet the latest standard.

Below is the 3 second max wind gust. Theoretically almost all of the Southern and Central coastal FL can handle up to a CAT 4 storm, however a landfalling CAT 5, given that it would contain higher gusts would certainly be an issue. 

Map of wind gusts used in Florida Building Code

https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/South-Floridas-Hurricane-Building-Code-StrongAnd-North-Floridas-Could-Be-Stronger

Much of the SE coast was built before the code, so no, it cannot withstand a cat 4 and be fine. My sister was in Wilma when her walls blew in. We saw roofs fly off buildings in Miami from Irma.

My buddy just bought a 72 year old house in coral gables and he said much of his area is very old.

to say that the area can withstand a cat 4 is wrong and irresponsible.

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Just now, psv88 said:

Much of the SE coast was built before the code, so no, it cannot withstand a cat 4 and be fine. My sister was in Wilma when her walls blew in. We saw roofs fly off buildings in Miami from Irma.

My buddy just bought a 72 year old house in coral gables and he said much of his area is very old.

to say that the area can withstand a cat 4 is wrong and irresponsible.

The problem with Wilma was that it came in from the Southwest. Most of the buildings on the East coast are only built to handle those winds coming in off the East. 

And yes, some buildings are built to the old code, but not much still exists from pre Andrew in that particular area. 

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17 minutes ago, NJwx85 said:

From the current Florida building code. I believe it was adopted in 2010, with the first changes coming in 2002. Obviously any structure built before then would not meet the latest standard.

Below is the 3 second max wind gust. Theoretically almost all of the Southern and Central coastal FL can handle up to a CAT 4 storm, however a landfalling CAT 5, given that it would contain higher gusts would certainly be an issue. 

Map of wind gusts used in Florida Building Code

https://www.wunderground.com/cat6/South-Floridas-Hurricane-Building-Code-StrongAnd-North-Floridas-Could-Be-Stronger

Water. Storm Surge and rainfall. That should be the focus in general, but especially down in southern Florida. 

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One thing I have noticed is how much the HWRF has been expanding the size of the storm and wind field in the day 3-4 range.

mdMpihn.gif

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