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Typhoon Tip

July pattern(s) and discussion

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Just took a drive over to the NW side of Newfound Lake.  Flash flooding was major.  Cockermouth River came way over it's banks bring down lots of trees.  This picture is not the river but a new channel it briefly cut through the woods.  Amazing how high the water came as you can see by the trailer stuck on the tree

Flash flood.jpg

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83/73 here... 

this temp bounce has been impressive since going more sun than clouds...  Up 10 in the last 2 hours.  

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13 hours ago, OceanStWx said:

This is all I can find.

Locations:

1945-09-01 to 1948-06-01 0.5 MI SE OF PO
1944-01-01 to 1945-09-01 0.2 MI NE OF PO
1942-02-01 to 1944-01-01 0.7 MI SW OF PO
1898-02-01 to 1942-02-01 0.2 MI N OF PO
Relocations
1945-09-01 .6 mi SE
1944-01-01 .8 mi NE
1942-02-01 .9 mi SSW

Thank you thank you!  for digging this out.  I'll assume, w/o further info, that the obs site remained the same from 6/1/48 until the current observer took over in 1966.  The move early in 1898 is telling, as all the 1890s triples occurred before then, and temps didn't again reach the mark until the 1911 inferno.  The one oddity that remains is the very mild minima of August 1949.  Farmington has had 38 minima 70+ in 126 years and the only months with more than 2 are 8/1896 (3) and 8/1949 (5).  Raising the bar to 72 drops the total to just 12, and 8/49 notched 4 of them.  No other month has had more than one.  Since that hot month, there's been only one day, 7/21/1977 (74) with a low milder than 71.

What does PO stand for, point of original?  Center of town?

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This tropical air is interesting as ground truth on rain accumulation rates seems to exceed 'what we're used to' associating to radar displays. 

I watched the radar off and on during the evening hours for central NE and saw mainly 1 sometimes blobs of 2 level orange... Which is "heavy" ... but, 5" ...?  Seems a tad pricey for that rad presentation. 

Obviously there are invisible factors such orographic lifting ...also, wasn't there easterly low level inflow of humid air?   These seem to condensate perhaps beneath the radar elevations and so load the column more... Because even with some training the actual ground truth is a bit more than 2 level orange. 

 

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3 hours ago, dryslot said:

Its all clay, I'm below grade on all sides, I need to haul in some loam and build it up, Never had a problem like this and have been here 30 yrs, It won't happen again.

That soil partially explains (to me) why your arborvitae turned brown - I'm assuming that's what "arbor" stands for.  Part of the problem may be the particular cultivar, because in the wild that species, Thuja occidentalis, is Northern white cedar which does quite well on most wet sites.  Always a relatively slow grower, that growth becomes miniscule when there's no water flow thru saturated soils, such as in bogs.  The tree does best in what's called a seepage forest, with saturated soils but continual slow water flow.  They like a sweet soil, part of their acid-bog problem (cedar is small and ragged-looking there) while growing fairly well in droughty shale pits where pH is much higher.  If you have more of those species in harm's way, a little lime or wood ashes might help, though improved drainage would do more (and both would be best.)

Rain didn't get to my place until 7:30 last evening and by 9 had dropped a whole 0.01", making me think - another miss is on the way.  However, by 7 this morning we'd had 0.87", never heavy though sometimes moderate, so a near-perfect drink for the garden.

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2 hours ago, dendrite said:

NNE likes to build meteorology schools in downsloped valleys...Plym and LSC. They should've built them at 1500'.

Gotta teach the aspiring mets how to deal with frustration, as they're apt to face a lot when they begin forecasting professionally.  ;)

Bits of blue amid the clouds here in Augusta.  68/66 at 1 PM.

 

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14 minutes ago, tamarack said:

That soil partially explains (to me) why your arborvitae turned brown - I'm assuming that's what "arbor" stands for.  Part of the problem may be the particular cultivar, because in the wild that species, Thuja occidentalis, is Northern white cedar which does quite well on most wet sites.  Always a relatively slow grower, that growth becomes miniscule when there's no water flow thru saturated soils, such as in bogs.  The tree does best in what's called a seepage forest, with saturated soils but continual slow water flow.  They like a sweet soil, part of their acid-bog problem (cedar is small and ragged-looking there) while growing fairly well in droughty shale pits where pH is much higher.  If you have more of those species in harm's way, a little lime or wood ashes might help, though improved drainage would do more (and both would be best.)

Rain didn't get to my place until 7:30 last evening and by 9 had dropped a whole 0.01", making me think - another miss is on the way.  However, by 7 this morning we'd had 0.87", never heavy though sometimes moderate, so a near-perfect drink for the garden.

Yes, Short for Arborvitaes, Improving the drainage will be problematic for those on that side, We will give them some lime though to see if that helps, I have 57 others around the property that are in much better shape then those two as you can see in this pic...............

Arbors.jpg

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6 minutes ago, dryslot said:

Yes, Short for Arborvitaes, Improving thew drainage will be problematic for those on that side, We will give them some lime though to see if that helps, I have 57 others around the property that are in much better shape then those two as you can see in this pic............…

 

Arbors.jpg

Nice hedge.  And though they are the same species as what you ride by in the wintertime swamps, sometimes the selecting for special traits like columnar growth can have some unexpected effects on other plant characteristics.  Maybe the nursery folks also selected for those trees that really really loved well-drained loams.  :axe:

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8 minutes ago, tamarack said:

Nice hedge.  And though they are the same species as what you ride by in the wintertime swamps, sometimes the selecting for special traits like columnar growth can have some unexpected effects on other plant characteristics.  Maybe the nursery folks also selected for those trees that really really loved well-drained loams.  :axe:

Thanks, I had made sure i selected pyramidal s so they would be tall growers, Where those are,  I have no drainage issues as its in a sloped area of the yard so those are thriving well in the 20' range and filled in too as i had planted them 39" apart back in 2007, They also are a great nesting sanctuary for birds as i have had multiple nest on the ground with damaged eggs.

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16 minutes ago, dryslot said:

Yes, Short for Arborvitaes, Improving the drainage will be problematic for those on that side, We will give them some lime though to see if that helps, I have 57 others around the property that are in much better shape then those two as you can see in this pic...............

Arbors.jpg

Love this, well done.

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2 minutes ago, RUNNAWAYICEBERG said:

Love this, well done.

Thanks, It was a lot of work originally but makes for a great natural barrier from the neighbors...:)

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Loathe the way they are used in suburbia.  I hacked mine down as they are anchors on the front of the house and they were topping out at like 18', obscuring the front of my house.  Took them down to like 8' and I think I will eventually remove them.

 

84/72

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4 hours ago, dryslot said:

Typically its to much water, But i have no problem on that end of things, Mine are self wicking so they take as much as they want.

 

Garden.jpg

Nice setup!  Never thought of storage bins for my tomatoes and peppers, and we just gave away a bunch of them a few months ago since they had been sitting in the attic for 10 years.

Tomato question for anybody . . . my tomato plants are growing fabulously (about 6') but I'm not getting any flowers.  I've seen conflicting information on-line; some says to fertilize while others say do not fertilize.  Any suggestions?

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7 minutes ago, Baroclinic Zone said:

Loathe the way they are used in suburbia.  I hacked mine down as they are anchors on the front of the house and they were topping out at like 18', obscuring the front of my house.  Took them down to like 8' and I think I will eventually remove them.

 

84/72

Once you top them, There growth upward ends, I'm going to let them go to there max, That may be only another 5-10' or so.

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15 minutes ago, HimoorWx said:

Nice setup!  Never thought of storage bins for my tomatoes and peppers, and we just gave away a bunch of them a few months ago since they had been sitting in the attic for 10 years.

Tomato question for anybody . . . my tomato plants are growing fabulously (about 6') but I'm not getting any flowers.  I've seen conflicting information on-line; some says to fertilize while others say do not fertilize.  Any suggestions?

Thanks, I already have Cherry and Beefsteaks and tons of flowers too, I hit those containers weekly with 2 ozs of liquid cal/mag+ made by Botanicare, They need a lot of supplements on the uptake in this growth period before flowering, I also mix in a cup of dolomite lime into the soil before planting, As well as a 2x2 strip of 10-10-10 fert, That prevents BER, (blossom end rot) It may also be the variety you have planted, I prefer the beefsteaks or better boys, Its more of a firm tomato which are great for burgers or sandwiches as well as marinating them.

Calmag.jpeg

Cherry.jpg

Beefsteak.jpg

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Just now, dryslot said:

Thanks, I already have Cherry and Beefsteaks and tons of flowers too, I hit those containers weekly with 2 ozs of liquid cal/mag+ made by Botanicare, They need a lot of supplements on the uptake in this growth period before flowering, I also mix in a cup of dolomite lime into the soil before planting, That prevents BER, (blossom end rot) It may also be the variety you have planted, I prefer the beefsteaks or better boys, Its more of a firm tomato which are great for burgers or sandwiches as well as marinating them.

 

 

Calmag.jpeg

Cherry.jpg

Beefsteak.jpg

Thanks.  Mine are better boy or big boy.  I'll give it a try.  At least my peppers are doing well!

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7 minutes ago, HimoorWx said:

Thanks.  Mine are better boy or big boy.  I'll give it a try.  At least my peppers are doing well!

Both of those are a good varieties, I love growing different variety of peppers, Of course on these days that are in the 80's here, The garden temp is 100°F+ as it faces SW, Which peppers and tomato's love the heat.

Temp.jpg

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If a mod wants to move all this to the banter thread, By all means, Getting some peaks of sun here now with temps slowly rising, 71/67°F.

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29 minutes ago, HimoorWx said:

Nice setup!  Never thought of storage bins for my tomatoes and peppers, and we just gave away a bunch of them a few months ago since they had been sitting in the attic for 10 years.

Tomato question for anybody . . . my tomato plants are growing fabulously (about 6') but I'm not getting any flowers.  I've seen conflicting information on-line; some says to fertilize while others say do not fertilize.  Any suggestions?

Too much nitrogen compared to other nutrients can favor vegetative growth over blossoms.  Offhand I don't recall whether it's phosphorus or potassium (the other 2 macronutrients) that fosters flowering.  Search engine should easily supply that info.

Still cloudy but thin enough so there are fuzzy shadows - 71/66.

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3 minutes ago, TheBudMan said:

I know this has morphed into tomato talk but nice summertime cell approaching Lowell right now :lol:

Looks like its short lived, Hopefully it wets the asphalt.......lol

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