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Summer 2019 New England Banter and Disco

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1 hour ago, #NoPoles said:

Dude, you guys are killing me. And I Dislike Nashville. Im trying to plan moving back. I will def chat with Alex.

I'm messaging you back right now! :)

It's funny, my sister said she would love the job but would NEVER even consider living somewhere where you get this much snow and cold. Which is kinda what prompted me to post something here!!! Where else can you find a bunch of awesome nuts who enjoy this kind of weather?

Granted, I'm pretty sure that as much as they love snow a majority of this board would not put up with our weather. It's a long relentless winter. 

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41 minutes ago, Cold Miser said:

...This is the shit to use.  You may never be able to have kids again, and die of diseases not discovered yet, but nothing comes near you.

20190910_184729_resized.jpg

That's what I have, and for me it's more like 5 hours than 10.  Except for the time we were camping/fishing in Deboullie Twp (25 miles SW from Ft. Kent) in June 1996.  I really don't like the stuff but there are things I like even less, such as hundreds of blackfly bites.  Had to apply as we transferred gear and canoes from vehicles to pond.  Just over an hour later we got to the west end of Deboullie Pond and the blackflies were biting hard so I put on more, which was effective for about an hour.  After that I looked for hiding places as hourly apps of Ben's 100 would not be healthy. (Found 2, our tent in the sun, about 120° inside with 1,000 flies trying to fly out thru the roof, and a much nicer place next to some ice and snow in the boulder crevices NW of the pond - too cold for them.) 

 Ten years living in that area and many visits since and I'd never encountered anything close to the density of those little beasts, before or since.  Folks with headnets were literally having trouble seeing thru the eager insects trying to get thru.  Normally when temps get into the mid 80s the blackflies retire to cover and leave the field for the deerflies, which are heatproof.  They could live and bite in the nether regions where they belong.  Ft. Kent hit 91 on our first full day and I'm sure it was just as hot where we were, but the blackflies didn't care.  Even out on the 275-acre pond, 500' from the nearest shore, the blackflies were thick - maybe too little airspace over the land?

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1 hour ago, alex said:

I'm messaging you back right now! :)

It's funny, my sister said she would love the job but would NEVER even consider living somewhere where you get this much snow and cold. Which is kinda what prompted me to post something here!!! Where else can you find a bunch of awesome nuts who enjoy this kind of weather?

Granted, I'm pretty sure that as much as they love snow a majority of this board would not put up with our weather. It's a long relentless winter. 

It would work for me except my wife would not let me leave state employment after 26 years!  She likes snow too but not as much as the pension in 4 more years!

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38 minutes ago, alex said:

Granted, I'm pretty sure that as much as they love snow a majority of this board would not put up with our weather. It's a long relentless winter. 

Yeah, there’s New England winter, then there’s NNE winter, then there’s NNNE/microclimate/mountains winter.  We’re not in an especially hefty snowpack preservation spot for around here, and even we average close to 5 months with snow on the ground each winter.  It’s not that we don’t have nice summers (I guess unless you want lots of heat and humidity), but you really want to have an interest in cold weather or “weather-independent” activities or the winters would probably seem interminable.

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45 minutes ago, J.Spin said:

Yeah, there’s New England winter, then there’s NNE winter, then there’s NNNE/microclimate/mountains winter.  We’re not in an especially hefty snowpack preservation spot for around here, and even we average close to 5 months with snow on the ground each winter.  It’s not that we don’t have nice summers (I guess unless you want lots of heat and humidity), but you really want to have an interest in cold weather or “weather-independent” activities or the winters would probably seem interminable.

That definitely describes us. Retention is not that good - especially compared to Bartlett/Hart's Location just on the other side of the notch, but we have several more weeks of snow on the ground than they do thanks to the early season snow and the better retention later in the season, when they warm up much faster. Also, the radiational cooling can give some pretty extreme morning lows (I have seen more -30's since moving here than I care to count), but to be honest I'm not sure that the difference between -30 and -10 really matters. Till it's above 0, it's cold and I tend to avoid being outside too long. 

 

Summer in my opinion is close to perfection. Warm during the day but not very hot, and get that sweater on at night. Just wish it weren't so short lived. 

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5 hours ago, tamarack said:

That's what I have, and for me it's more like 5 hours than 10.  Except for the time we were camping/fishing in Deboullie Twp (25 miles SW from Ft. Kent) in June 1996.  I really don't like the stuff but there are things I like even less, such as hundreds of blackfly bites.  Had to apply as we transferred gear and canoes from vehicles to pond.  Just over an hour later we got to the west end of Deboullie Pond and the blackflies were biting hard so I put on more, which was effective for about an hour.  After that I looked for hiding places as hourly apps of Ben's 100 would not be healthy. (Found 2, our tent in the sun, about 120° inside with 1,000 flies trying to fly out thru the roof, and a much nicer place next to some ice and snow in the boulder crevices NW of the pond - too cold for them.) 

 Ten years living in that area and many visits since and I'd never encountered anything close to the density of those little beasts, before or since.  Folks with headnets were literally having trouble seeing thru the eager insects trying to get thru.  Normally when temps get into the mid 80s the blackflies retire to cover and leave the field for the deerflies, which are heatproof.  They could live and bite in the nether regions where they belong.  Ft. Kent hit 91 on our first full day and I'm sure it was just as hot where we were, but the blackflies didn't care.  Even out on the 275-acre pond, 500' from the nearest shore, the blackflies were thick - maybe too little airspace over the land?

Awful story.  Same shit in the Adirondacks.  There is about 2-6 weeks in late May through June that you just dont want to be outside.   There is actually a road race named the Blackfly challenge during that period.  2 words, Fu.ck That.

That Bens is good , but like you say, not 10 hours. Also, its not supposed to be applied to the skin, which I have done.

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13 hours ago, alex said:

That definitely describes us. Retention is not that good - especially compared to Bartlett/Hart's Location just on the other side of the notch, but we have several more weeks of snow on the ground than they do thanks to the early season snow and the better retention later in the season, when they warm up much faster. Also, the radiational cooling can give some pretty extreme morning lows (I have seen more -30's since moving here than I care to count), but to be honest I'm not sure that the difference between -30 and -10 really matters. Till it's above 0, it's cold and I tend to avoid being outside too long. 

If it's flat calm those 2 temps don't feel terribly different at first, but if one needs to be outside a while, or tries to start a vehicle, the difference becomes stark.  And if it's windy...

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1 hour ago, tamarack said:

If it's flat calm those 2 temps don't feel terribly different at first, but if one needs to be outside a while, or tries to start a vehicle, the difference becomes stark.  And if it's windy...

Last time i was up to the county 10 yrs ago riding it was -15 to -30°F, When its that cold, You can't tell the difference either..............:lol:

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55 minutes ago, dryslot said:

Last time i was up to the county 10 yrs ago riding it was -15 to -30°F, When its that cold, You can't tell the difference either..............:lol:

Yeah it’s like when folks discuss heat... anything near and above 90F just all feels the same.  97F or 90F, its just hot.  

Like wind in winter, humidity in summer is the difference maker.

A day of -5F but calm and full sun feels a lot better than a windy 10F that’s damp with 2sm -SN mist all day.

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Just now, powderfreak said:

Yeah it’s like when folks discuss heat... anything near and above 90F just all feels the same.  97F or 90F, its just hot.  

Like wind in winter, humidity in summer is the difference maker.

It is different in the summer because dews and humidity, But in the cold, You have neither so once you cross those thresholds its less of a factor in the winter, Wind chill adds some factors in though.

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6 minutes ago, dryslot said:

It is different in the summer because dews and humidity, But in the cold, You have neither so once you cross those thresholds its less of a factor in the winter, Wind chill adds some factors in though.

See I’ve noticed moisture more in the winter in recent years that makes a big difference.  Dry cold with 10sm CLR is quite nice.   But man those days where it’s real cold and the ASOS never has a vis over 3sm all day because of small arctic sand style flakes...it’s just bone-chilling raw feeling.  NW wind squeezing what little moisture is left out of the atmosphere, not accumulating to much of anything but just that damp high RH arctic cold that seems to chill you to the core.  

I think of those differences like humidity vs no humidity in summer.

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3 minutes ago, powderfreak said:

See I’ve noticed moisture more in the winter in recent years that makes a big difference.  Dry cold with 10sm CLR is quite nice.   But man those days where it’s real cold and the ASOS never has a vis over 3sm all day because of small arctic sand style flakes...it’s just bone-chilling raw feeling.  NW wind squeezing what little moisture is left out of the atmosphere, not accumulating to much of anything but just that damp high RH arctic cold that seems to chill you to the core.  

I think of those differences like humidity vs no humidity in summer.

You mean like where the phrase in the hot weather comes in Arizona that its a dry heat?  Or it can't snow if its at or below zero.     :lol:

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1 hour ago, dryslot said:

You mean like where the phrase in the hot weather comes in Arizona that its a dry heat?  Or it can't snow if its at or below zero.     :lol:

The response to the first part is, "My oven is a dry heat!" 
To the 2nd, I've seen SN+ at -15 (obviously warmer aloft) and moderate SN at -25.  Last winter's biggest snowfall (Jan 19-20) came mostly with temps -2 to -4, and 2/2/15 we had 7" at about -5.  The early Jan 2014 event gave us 2" at 10-12 below before rising to the max of -5 late.  (North edge of a much bigger storm, with serious cold about - CAR temp -15/-28, 2nd lowest max on record.  Lowest, -16, was on 1/4/81, the day I saw SN at -25.)

The temp difference becomes important the longer one is out in it.  When I first sit for deer (ground only - never been in a tree stand) the difference between -2 and +12 is slight, for maybe 10-15 minutes.  By 40-60 minutes, when deer have typically appeared (if at all) the difference becomes acute, feet/hands losing feeling and an overall stiffness when it's near zero, much less so at low teens.  That said, I again quote the U. Maine forestry prof who said, "There's no such thing as inclement weather, just improper clothing."

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8 minutes ago, tamarack said:

The response to the first part is, "My oven is a dry heat!" 
To the 2nd, I've seen SN+ at -15 (obviously warmer aloft) and moderate SN at -25.  Last winter's biggest snowfall (Jan 19-20) came mostly with temps -2 to -4, and 2/2/15 we had 7" at about -5.  The early Jan 2014 event gave us 2" at 10-12 below before rising to the max of -5 late.  (North edge of a much bigger storm, with serious cold about - CAR temp -15/-28, 2nd lowest max on record.  Lowest, -16, was on 1/4/81, the day I saw SN at -25.)

The temp difference becomes important the longer one is out in it.  When I first sit for deer (ground only - never been in a tree stand) the difference between -2 and +12 is slight, for maybe 10-15 minutes.  By 40-60 minutes, when deer have typically appeared (if at all) the difference becomes acute, feet/hands losing feeling and an overall stiffness when it's near zero, much less so at low teens.  That said, I again quote the U. Maine forestry prof who said, "There's no such thing as inclement weather, just improper clothing."

Sitting in the cold hunting, There is a considerable difference in temps below zero to temps above in the single digits, You lose a lot of thermal and it doesn't matter how much clothing you have on, When i'm hunting in these cold temps and have to walk to get to where my ground stand is, I only wear one layer walking in to keep down the sweating as much as possible, Thats what brings on the chill much sooner having moisture trapped against your skin, That's the reason why i like wearing Under Armor, It wicks moisture away from your skin into your secondary base layer,  I always have a pack i wear, So my jacket and extra clothing is in there and once i get to my spot, I will sit and cool down some then put on another couple layers, I have found this to work and be much more successful to be able to sit for longer periods of time in frigid temps, Obviously, I like to already be tagged out before we get into the last week of hunting so i don't have to endure any of the extreme cold, But that's not always the case...........:(

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2 minutes ago, dryslot said:

Sitting in the cold hunting, There is a considerable difference in temps below zero to temps above in the single digits, You lose a lot of thermal and it doesn't matter how much clothing you have on, When i'm hunting in these cold temps and have to walk to get to where my ground stand is, I only wear one layer walking in to keep down the seating as thats what brings on the chill, I always have a pack i wear, So my jacket and extra clothing is in there and once i get to my spot, I will sit and cool down some then put on another couple layers, I have found this to work and be much more successful to be able to sit for longer periods of time in frigid temps, Obviously, I like to already be tagged out before we get into the last week of hunting so i don't have to endure any of the extreme cold, But that's not always the case...........:(

About 3/4 of the deer I've shot came on middle Saturday or later.  Though my first ever deer (90-lb yearling spike in PA) came on opening day, I've yet to fill a tag in Maine before 2nd Saturday.  Takes me a while to find one dumb enough for me to shoot.  :lol:  And as I get older my willingness to endure long-time cold while inactive has waned.  This past Thanksgiving I never even went out, first time in my 46 Maine deer seasons that happened on T-day when I was in-state - missed a couple while traveling.  Of course, an afternoon max of 9° with winds gusting into the 30s was a major disincentive.

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1 minute ago, tamarack said:

About 3/4 of the deer I've shot came on middle Saturday or later.  Though my first ever deer (90-lb yearling spike in PA) came on opening day, I've yet to fill a tag in Maine before 2nd Saturday.  Takes me a while to find one dumb enough for me to shoot.  :lol:  And as I get older my willingness to endure long-time cold while inactive has waned.  This past Thanksgiving I never even went out, first time in my 46 Maine deer seasons that happened on T-day when I was in-state - missed a couple while traveling.  Of course, an afternoon max of 9° with winds gusting into the 30s was a major disincentive.

I’ve shot a few opening day but I do some advanced scouting, This year, I have a nephew that bought a 27 acre parcel in AUB which has deer all thru his property with hardwood and a bog so I won’t have to travel far and have a place to warm up if need be, I was out last thanksgiving, But I was in a low lying bog of cedar but i was asking myself what the heck am I doing in those temps and wind.

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2 hours ago, powderfreak said:

See I’ve noticed moisture more in the winter in recent years that makes a big difference.  Dry cold with 10sm CLR is quite nice.   But man those days where it’s real cold and the ASOS never has a vis over 3sm all day because of small arctic sand style flakes...it’s just bone-chilling raw feeling.  NW wind squeezing what little moisture is left out of the atmosphere, not accumulating to much of anything but just that damp high RH arctic cold that seems to chill you to the core.  

I think of those differences like humidity vs no humidity in summer.

With chickens...frigid temps + high RH = frostbite and possible death. Frigid temps + low RH = no problem.

People worry about cold temps in their coops and close it all up to keep it warmer, but all it does is trap moisture inside. Those who know keep plenty of ventilation at the top of their coops without and drafts reaching the birds below. Gotta let that moisture out.

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My point wasn't that there is no difference. My point was more that whether it's -10 or -30 I still don't really do much of anything outside so it doesn't matter. I usually even avoid skiing if it's below 0. I don't care for it. 

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29 minutes ago, alex said:

My point wasn't that there is no difference. My point was more that whether it's -10 or -30 I still don't really do much of anything outside so it doesn't matter. I usually even avoid skiing if it's below 0. I don't care for it. 

Yeah but you know how us weather nerds like to jump right past the point and digress further into nerdom.

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23 hours ago, tamarack said:

That's what I have, and for me it's more like 5 hours than 10.  Except for the time we were camping/fishing in Deboullie Twp (25 miles SW from Ft. Kent) in June 1996.  I really don't like the stuff but there are things I like even less, such as hundreds of blackfly bites.  Had to apply as we transferred gear and canoes from vehicles to pond.  Just over an hour later we got to the west end of Deboullie Pond and the blackflies were biting hard so I put on more, which was effective for about an hour.  After that I looked for hiding places as hourly apps of Ben's 100 would not be healthy. (Found 2, our tent in the sun, about 120° inside with 1,000 flies trying to fly out thru the roof, and a much nicer place next to some ice and snow in the boulder crevices NW of the pond - too cold for them.) 

 Ten years living in that area and many visits since and I'd never encountered anything close to the density of those little beasts, before or since.  Folks with headnets were literally having trouble seeing thru the eager insects trying to get thru.  Normally when temps get into the mid 80s the blackflies retire to cover and leave the field for the deerflies, which are heatproof.  They could live and bite in the nether regions where they belong.  Ft. Kent hit 91 on our first full day and I'm sure it was just as hot where we were, but the blackflies didn't care.  Even out on the 275-acre pond, 500' from the nearest shore, the blackflies were thick - maybe too little airspace over the land?

Welcome to my world from about Mother's Day to Father's Day. They are insane! Clouds of them! DEET is useless against the little buggers too. The deer flies start about early June, so there's about a 1-2 week period where they overlap, and that's the peak of bug season. Living in a mostly spruce/fir grove, there are plenty of vernal pools and shady spots for them to reproduce and take shelter.

Then there's a period of horse flies that starts about mid July and runs through mid August. Very large flies, but they aren't nearly as aggressive as the deer flies, and they tend to go for the legs where as the deer flies go for the head or arms. No mosquitos this year though due to the dryer summer we've had. Virtually no biting insects now, thank God. One of the small downsides to living in the woods of NNE (well, CNE if you go strictly by my latitude). 

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I've found that if one stands very still, deerflies tend to lose interest.  (Of course, that gives blackflies and mosquitos a free shot.)  During deerfly season (mid-June thru about Labor Day here) I'll pick up an escort or three within 10 yards of leaving the house - fortunately not 100+ like I'd get while cruising timber in the Allagash-St. John country.  Makes me wonder of those insects are related to T-Rex (the Jurassic Park version, that can't see you if you don't move), as their bite hurts beyond what their size would suggest. 

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@dryslot.

Not sure if you’ve had a chance to speak with your buddy about my well situation. I spoke to a plumber today and he said my best bet is to contact a well company and have them treat the well itself with some chemical. He said it would rid the smell for a couple years anyway.

 

So you or anyone else for that matter know what this could be? I can’t really find any information on a company coming out and just dumping something in

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4 minutes ago, #NoPoles said:

Currently 650pm and my heat index is holding steady at 100. Had a high of 99 on mon or tues, today we hit 98...puts our heat index 105-107

A high temp around 60F today.  Fall is in the air.  I have not paid too much attention to down south and was surprised when my Dad said Baltimore hit a record of 98F today.  We got up to the upper 70's today.  Average high for me is around 72F now.  70F plus days will become fewer and fewer.  Don't worry it will cool down by Thanksgiving in Nashville

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3 hours ago, TauntonBlizzard2013 said:

@dryslot.

Not sure if you’ve had a chance to speak with your buddy about my well situation. I spoke to a plumber today and he said my best bet is to contact a well company and have them treat the well itself with some chemical. He said it would rid the smell for a couple years anyway.

 

So you or anyone else for that matter know what this could be? I can’t really find any information on a company coming out and just dumping something in

Have not seen him yet, He was not at our last meeting but i have a a few coming up in the next couple weeks so i will ask and see what he recommends.

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32 minutes ago, #NoPoles said:

Currently 650pm and my heat index is holding steady at 100. Had a high of 99 on mon or tues, today we hit 98...puts our heat index 105-107

Jeebus that’s gross. 52F here.   Chilly.  Come back home Di.  We miss ya!

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27 minutes ago, HoarfrostHubb said:

Jeebus that’s gross. 52F here.   Chilly.  Come back home Di.  We miss ya!

I miss you crazy NE weenies! 

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2 hours ago, #NoPoles said:

Currently 650pm and my heat index is holding steady at 100. Had a high of 99 on mon or tues, today we hit 98...puts our heat index 105-107

My car thermo touched 49 on the way home from golf tonight. I think that was my HI too. 

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