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NorEastermass128

February 2019 Discussion I

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2 minutes ago, CoastalWx said:

1 cubic yard = 27 cubic feet

 

1 minute ago, HoarfrostHubb said:

But I think her question was for a cubic yard of snow that had the density of this most recent event?

the 20 lbs/ cubic foot she mentioned was prob a 10:1 type snow.  This was denser I think 

Disclaimer- i have forgotten everything i used to know....also i suck at math...

Generically, given that 1 cubic foot weighs 20lbs, how do i figure out how much a cubic yard weighs? 

Lets say that is 10:1 ratio, is there a table somewhere to look up other ratios? Of say this snowfall was an 8:1 ratio, what would i do?

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4 minutes ago, HoarfrostHubb said:

But I think her question was for a cubic yard of snow that had the density of this most recent event?

the 20 lbs/ cubic foot she mentioned was prob a 10:1 type snow.  This was denser I think 

if this was 5:1 including the sleet and rain, figure double that weight then multiply by 27

Guess ratio and go from that. 7-8:1 is a good guess. So add 25-30% of weight?

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4 minutes ago, #NoPoles said:

 

Disclaimer- i have forgotten everything i used to know....also i suck at math...

Generically, given that 1 cubic foot weighs 20lbs, how do i figure out how much a cubic yard weighs? 

Lets say that is 10:1 ratio, is there a table somewhere to look up other ratios? Of say this snowfall was an 8:1 ratio, what would i do?

1 cubic foot = .037 cubic yards, roughly. 

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Omg, i am having math anxiety....this is why i didnt make it in the meteorology program at lyndon state. So many numbers, and i know what i need, i just dont know what to do with the numbers to get what i need

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1 minute ago, #NoPoles said:

Omg, i am having math anxiety....this is why i didnt make it in the meteorology program at lyndon state. So many numbers, and i know what i need, i just dont know what to do with the numbers to get what i need

Don’t put your snow in the freezer yet, it will snow again for you someday.

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For 10:1 ratio (1.2 inches of liquid water in the cubic foot with density of 62.4 lb/ft3), a cubic foot would only weigh 6.24 lbs so a cubic yard would be 27 times that for 168.48 lbs.

For 8:1 ratio (1.5 inches of liquid water), a cubic foot would weighs 7.8 lbs so a cubic yard would be 210.6 lbs.

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2 minutes ago, HoarfrostHubb said:

Several sources I see have 1” of snow weighing 1.25 lbs per square foot

1" of water over 1 sq ft is 929 mL, at 20 deg C, 760 torr of atmospheric pressure that would be 929 g or 2.08 lbs. Probably a little more than that for water near 0 deg C.

 

For 1" deep snow, assuming a 10:1 ratio, that's 0.208 lbs/ft^2, more if sleet/wet snow, less if fluff.

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A cubic yard of water weighs around 1700 pounds....so just adjust given your snow to water ratio if you want to get the weight of a cubic yard of snow.

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So I see 31 new posts and half of them are figuring out how much a cubic yard of snow weighs...

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6 minutes ago, Damage In Tolland said:

Can anyone throw up the NAM ice accretion Sunday?

.12

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16 minutes ago, weathafella said:

So I see 31 new posts and half of them are figuring out how much a cubic yard of snow weighs...

Terrible thread is cooked!

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39 minutes ago, Connecticut Appleman said:

FWIW - water reaches a maximum density at approx 4 C or 40 F.  The density of water decreases as you approach the freezing point.

Yup...below 4C the water molecules start to arrange themselves in hexagonal arrangements in preparation for freezing at 0C. I’ve found you need to get the wetbulbs above that 3-4C mark to really start melting the snow in a torch.

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1 hour ago, #NoPoles said:

@CoastalWx @OceanStWx @dendrite

Or any other math person. How do you calculate the weight of a cubic yard of snow? I googled a cubic foot of snow generically weighs 20lbs. How would you calculate for my area based on the water content of the storm that just fell?

I dunno ... 170 lbs...

figure 10:1 and go from there...  If 1700 lb is a cubic yard of liquid water, that implies 1700/10:1, which is the thus (1700/10) X 1 = 170

But ...real life seldom resembles real numbers...  If you "fill" snow into a yardXyardXyard bin... it's probably highly aerated and therefore, not really 10:1... more like 20 :1 or perhaps 15 ...or something less dense than 10:1 ... So you gotta kinda use your head.

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26 minutes ago, Whineminster said:

last NAM map showed i think 1" of ice in C MA/NE CT. We take ice, we take trees down. 

You’ve become a DIT clone with your weather preferences. Kinda creepy.

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