Jump to content
  • Member Statistics

    15,452
    Total Members
    7,904
    Most Online
    cberr1957
    Newest Member
    cberr1957
    Joined
WxWatcher007

Major Hurricane Michael

Recommended Posts

18 minutes ago, Calderon said:

Any naysayer of category 4 winds in Mexico Beach, here's 100% proof.

 

 

Decent video.

surge looks similar damage caused by sandy in N.J./NY years ago. Caused significant structure failure due to loose building codes.

strong cat 2 or low cat 3 winds.

 

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 3
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Animal said:

Decent video.

surge looks similar damage caused by sandy in N.J./NY years ago. Caused significant structure failure due to loose building codes.

strong cat 2 or low cat 3 winds.

 

I love a good troll that can't accept video evidence of wind speed and can be compared to Charley and look nearly exactly the same. 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Animal said:

Decent video.

surge looks similar damage caused by sandy in N.J./NY years ago. Caused significant structure failure due to loose building codes.

strong cat 2 or low cat 3 winds.

 

Sandy couldn’t hold Michael’s jockstrap. 940mb vs 919mb. I know you’re trolling but please stop for the love of god 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, 40/70 Benchmark said:

Some people just need to see the Earth's crust lifted into the air in order to accept a storm as severe.

But that's something I see twice every day (tides). Clearly not evidence of a severe storm!

Kidding aside, I'm now getting confused as to which people are truly trolling and which people are sarcastically making fun of the trolls at this point.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, f2tornado said:

Most ASOS are in open areas since the most accurate wind readings are taken at a distance of 10x or greater the height of an obstruction. Debris impact is possible but I would think not a common scenario given the general distance from stuff. If you make a sensor too heavy/durable then it can have a very slow response rate. Here’s a fun old school tidbit: Back in the days before mobile internet I would call the ASOS for the observations on storm chase days. 

I still call the ASOS during winter events for temp and precip type.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Both hospitals in Panama City were destroyed. There was a steady stream of Medical helicopters yesterday over the Panhandle as they transported patients to various new locations. Here are some pics from Bay Medical Center.

image.thumb.png.cb4a846d98c2bd55f0050287d050447d.png

image.png.2626f311d0c3ac91dbe3937a61eefbac.png

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/9/2018 at 9:06 AM, HKY_WX said:

 I don't usually make these posts, but there's a few things slightly disturbing about this one to me from a loss of life/property standpoint...

- Forward movement is going to bring this in by early/midday tomorrow throwing a lot of people's preparations off

- The persistent steady strengthening despite moderate shear, which is expected to decrease today

- Forward motion will bring wind impacts well inland

- Surge potential on the right side given the shape of the Florida Coastline combined with the overall size of the Cane(Circulation/extension of Hurricane Force Winds)

- Consistent model projections of a strengthening storm up until landfall

- Lastly and perhaps not the most important, but it's appearance this morning on Visible/IR. The spiraling convective bands, developing eye, improving outflow/symmetry to me points towards continued strengthening all day

 

 

Sometimes the worst/most memorable storms tend to slip up on us at the last minute...

 

Hate being right in this case...

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Calderon said:

Any naysayer of category 4 winds in Mexico Beach, here's 100% proof.

 

 

The sounds in the background (house alarms?) make that a particularly ominous video. Like some post-apocalyptic setting --- which in a very real if geographically limited sense, I suppose it is right now. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, 09-10 analogy said:

The sounds in the background (house alarms?) make that a particularly ominous video. Like some post-apocalyptic setting --- which in a very real if geographically limited sense, I suppose it is right now. 

That is pretty much a standard apartment/business/hotel "fire alarm" siren (has replaced or is replacing the old fire alarm "bell").  It is the most f'in annoying thing to hear when the blaster is right outside of your office, where it can just about burst your eardrums. :yikes:

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried reading through to see if this has already been posted. If it has, I just missed it and I apologize. anyway, here are "after" satellite photos of the entire affected area along the immediate coastline. The map should start at Mexico Beach. You can move NSEW just like on Google Maps.

https://storms.ngs.noaa.gov/storms/michael/index.html#15/29.9466/-85.4208

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NY Times photo graphic on Mexico Beach:

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/10/12/us/mexico-beach-fl-damage-map.html?action=click&module=Spotlight&pgtype=Homepage

"We used aerial images of Mexico Beach taken before and after Hurricane Michael to assess the extent of the damage along a 1.2-mile stretch of the town. Of 440 buildings we could identify, 237, or 54 percent, were destroyed and 99, or 23 percent, were severely damaged — almost all of these were homes. The level of damage sustained by the remaining structures was unclear."

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Two more fatalities in Danville, Virginia from the storm. 3 total from my area alone.. Could be more as the day goes on...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Animal said:

Decent video.

surge looks similar damage caused by sandy in N.J./NY years ago. Caused significant structure failure due to loose building codes.

strong cat 2 or low cat 3 winds.

 

It's called a psychological defense mechanism. People are still refusing to admit that they are to blame. Yes major hurricanes have hit the coast before but it's obvious that they just became way more common. Waiting for the supporting data to come in is going to kill our chances once again.

  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, cheese007 said:

Remarkable that as of the last NHC advisory Michael was still packing 65mph winds

it was already extra tropical at that time...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, abell said:

From the NOAA imagery:

https://storms.ngs.noaa.gov/storms/michael/index.html#18/30.06834/-85.59139

What looks like an F-15 flipped on its back at the entrance to the AFB.

 

That was an exhibit plane, one of the displays that every AFB seems to have for visitors.

I can't remember if this specific display was bolted down to concrete blocks, or just held by cables.  But either way it's impressive to think of what forces it would have taken to break it off the base, even a stripped, fuel-less and therefore much lighter than usual plane.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Calderon said:

Any naysayer of category 4 winds in Mexico Beach, here's 100% proof.

 

 

WOW! This is one of the most incredible videos I have ever watched. unbelievable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the images you can see a few things

1. Residential damage looks a bit worse as you head east from Panama City toward Callaway, as you see more houses there with complete loss of roof/major structural failure. though its hard to make  a final judgement without knowing construction quality or if small scale dynamics with the wind were at play at specific locations.

2. Commercial/industrial infrastructure just got shredded. Look at Bus-98 from PC to Parker. You can tell just from the aerial that a high percentage of those buildings are total losses.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For anyone wondering how the Cape San Blas/St Joesph's Peninsula area fared, there is a reason you have not heard much:

From what I can tell, the peninsula is almost completely inaccessible. Broken apart into multiple islands. Could not tell you if anyone (first responders/media/etc) has made it out there. All I have seen are these satellite images.

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ocean City Maryland's inlet was cut during the 1933 Chesapeake-Potomac Hurricane. The inlet helped that city bloom into a great fishing town. I hope eventually the people from the St. Joseph Peninsula area are able to prosper from their new inlet as well. What an unreal storm.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at some of the stick-built housing subdivisions in parts of Calloway....there are homes that may have some minor looking roof damage, and then there are scattered homes on the same street or nearby that are nearly identical but have completely lost all or part of the roofs. Where the houses have only lost part of the roof, the worst damage is right where the garage is located. I wonder if these scattered total losses in otherwise mostly intact neighborhoods show where garage doors failed and let the wind into the inside envelope of the house?

 

Also the area around old Calloway and south and east of the Walmart looks pretty bad. Some of the manufactured housing and mobile homes came through fine, and then there are other clusters of them where there is severe damage. I wonder if that has to do with the age of them and how well they were secured?  You don't see entire mobile home parks leveled. Maybe that is due to better regulations or construction since Andrew?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ocean City Maryland's inlet was cut during the 1933 Chesapeake-Potomac Hurricane. The inlet helped that city bloom into a great fishing town. I hope eventually the people from the St. Joseph Peninsula area are able to prosper from their new inlet as well. What an unreal storm.


I suspect they will not keep any inlets on the Cape. The bay is completely open on the west side. It’s likely the cut was at an area called “Stump hole” this spit of land is barely wider than the road itself. The biggest economic driver of Gulf county is tourism fueled by the bay. It’s truly pristine and the only bay on the eastern gulf that gets almost no freshwater intrusion. I scallop there every year (one of the few places to do so). I assume that the leaders of Gulf county will do nothing that would mess with the ecosystem of the bay.


.
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SharonA said:

That was an exhibit plane, one of the displays that every AFB seems to have for visitors.

I can't remember if this specific display was bolted down to concrete blocks, or just held by cables.  But either way it's impressive to think of what forces it would have taken to break it off the base, even a stripped, fuel-less and therefore much lighter than usual plane.

 

That's exactly correct

Capture.PNG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×