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USCAPEWEATHERAF

Hmmm, A July Hybrid Storm? - Possibly

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30 minutes ago, Typhoon Tip said:

Has to do with sourcing... 

It's all bullschit human conventions either way ... but Bermuda Blue is the idea of a deep troposphere of warm air that is devoid of more typical impurities you find with higher heat and humidity ... also arriving from an unusual direction - obviously...the tropics.  

More typically, blues like ...it's Bahama Blues by the way...but Bermuda works too.. anyway, blues like today come/came from Canadian house cleaner air masses.  This one's getting a bit old - unusual to be on D4 at this time of year, and not have it be more polluted by now, but hat's 'sides the point.  

With Bahama blue sky, the air mass is coming from a purified source, but it doesn't bring 'cooler' air per se, it brings warmer ...both for moisture content, and temperature... You end up with very pure blue skies in torrid heat (if enough sun cuts through)...  when more typically, 'heat' in general arrives with a pal sky and gray-blue tinted air when peering at a distance. 

Yeah the past couple days have the look in the mountains of a Canadian air source, where from Mt Mansfield in VT, it looks like you can touch MWN over in NH.  It's that clear...as low dews typically are with less water vapor in the surface layer.  

 

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6 minutes ago, powderfreak said:

Yeah the past couple days have the look in the mountains of a Canadian air source, where from Mt Mansfield in VT, it looks like you can touch MWN over in NH.  It's that clear...as low dews typically are with less water vapor in the surface layer.  

 

Most of the obscuration is due to particulates/haze. When the source region is the megalopolis the air quality alerts start to spring up and we get the HZ ALOFT obs from MWN. If we can back in a (pick your own B country) blue airmass from a tropical source region, the visibility tends to be pretty high too despite higher dews. 

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12 minutes ago, powderfreak said:

Yeah the past couple days have the look in the mountains of a Canadian air source, where from Mt Mansfield in VT, it looks like you can touch MWN over in NH.  It's that clear...as low dews typically are with less water vapor in the surface layer.  

 

wv is really not that bad on visibility to tell you the truth... It's that 'baze' that causes that pal and bad air quality - it's a mix of ozones and biomist ... poly aeromatic particulates, baked in the oven ...  think (biological farts + water vapor + contaminant aerosol (usually man-made) + solar energy) = can't see MWN

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28 minutes ago, dendrite said:

Most of the obscuration is due to particulates/haze. When the source region is the megalopolis the air quality alerts start to spring up and we get the HZ ALOFT obs from MWN. If we can back in a (pick your own B country) blue airmass from a tropical source region, the visibility tends to be pretty high too despite higher dews. 

 

26 minutes ago, Typhoon Tip said:

wv is really not that bad on visibility to tell you the truth... It's that 'baze' that causes that pal and bad air quality - it's a mix of ozones and biomist ... poly aeromatic particulates, baked in the oven ...  think (biological farts + water vapor + contaminant aerosol (usually man-made) + solar energy) = can't see MWN

Ahh very interesting guys.  I honestly always thought it was the increasing water vapor in the boundary layer.  So it's more the man-made crap from say the Ohio Valley and big urban areas like NYC/PHL, etc blowing in on S/SW winds?  Where as the crisp air is just unmolested air from Canada?  

I guess I just always put it together like, hey the visibility is hazy and can't see past eastern VT hills, and MVL has a Td of 68F.  Then other times it's like wow I can touch MWN and wave to the observatory... and MVL has a 42F dew.  Just made that connection and assumed...

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So the sky is still that great classic blue in say the USVI?  Or even say Key West or something?  I always know the dry air is has arrived when the sky is thy great blue color.....missed that in summer when we moved east from SF Bay Area

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I don't know why the topic of the Bahama Blues interests me but it is really different than the clear, clean polar air masses.  I remember it years ago right after Hurricane Gloria passed.  People in the Boston area that evening were commenting on the fact that the airmass just looked and felt different.  If it happens next week you'll know the feeling.  Dews can be very high yet great visibility and that breezy feel of the deep tropics especially if we get the building white low base Cu's against the dark blue sky. Different feeling and look from the usual SW flows passing over the continent first...

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Can see the low just off the coast on satellite this morning. Looks like the best spinner risk would be down in Jersey? Nice combo of high theta-e, helicity and marginal instability tonight.

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3 hours ago, RUNNAWAYICEBERG said:

1-2” is still good enough to tame the severe drought conditions. 

Tolland drought will continue. It's a magical place with twice normal snowfall in winter and sub-normal rainfall in summer.

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1 hour ago, Great Snow 1717 said:

So now someone is predicting little to no rain?? What about the call for "thousands" of trees down??? Geez what a let down!!

Landphoon cancal.

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as a whole - yeah the widespread heavy stuff looks to go west, but I'd watch out for a narrow zone that gets dumped on tmrw. Thinking there will be N-S oriented band of localized 2"-4"+ totals somewhere east of 91 for sure. 

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what ...

Little reality check ... no extreme scenarios were very likely from this interval of time, today through next Wednesday...

Anyone "disappointed" by that reality now... I suspect they gave into the typical meme/self-reinforcing ... spontaneous delusional aspect of crowd noise.  It's a fascinating phenomenon ... one quite endemic to this new technological forcing in human evolution - an internet run over by common heads given access to a public platform...

wah wah waaaa 

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17 hours ago, powderfreak said:

 

Ahh very interesting guys.  I honestly always thought it was the increasing water vapor in the boundary layer.  So it's more the man-made crap from say the Ohio Valley and big urban areas like NYC/PHL, etc blowing in on S/SW winds?  Where as the crisp air is just unmolested air from Canada?  

I guess I just always put it together like, hey the visibility is hazy and can't see past eastern VT hills, and MVL has a Td of 68F.  Then other times it's like wow I can touch MWN and wave to the observatory... and MVL has a 42F dew.  Just made that connection and assumed...

It's really the size of the aerosols/particulates that matters.

Typically the small aerosols in air scatter small wavelength light (blue) and that's what we see. The more you introduce pollutants, the more larger wavelengths are preferentially scattered. So in addition to the natural scattering of blue, you are adding more and more towards the red (which when combined creates a hazy white). Then towards sunset (or sunrise) the longer path length through the atmosphere scatters more reds to our eyes than blues. So your pollution or smokey sunsets are more colorful.

Water vapor on the other hand would tend to absorb the longer (red) wavelengths, so it doesn't contribute nearly as much to the haze as pollutants do.

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47 minutes ago, OceanStWx said:

It just so happens our high dew air mass come from the Gulf of Mexico, which is SW of us and an upstream pollution source.

Gotcha.  That makes sense.  Thanks for the explanation from you, Tippy and Dendrite.

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Looks like that low coming up the coast is connected to the upper level low circulation centered over the great lakes. The moisture blob is def going way west steered by that UL circulation

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16 minutes ago, powderfreak said:

Gotcha.  That makes sense.  Thanks for the explanation from you, Tippy and Dendrite.

Ha ha ha.... yeah between the three of us, I think we really nailed it down huh

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9 minutes ago, TauntonBlizzard2013 said:

Yeah, I’m not all that impressed by rain prospects for this area. Way west for the good stuff. 

Hoping we can score enough to wet the ground 

Glad this evolution is taking place now, and not five months from now....Wiz would be firing up severe threads on Christmas eve.

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1 hour ago, 40/70 Benchmark said:

Glad this evolution is taking place now, and not five months from now....Wiz would be firing up severe threads on Christmas eve.

Ha ha!  I joked about this very same thing .... This thread had days of lies up our fannies ...now, so deep inland that by the time that gets to our latitudes, ...it's really not even a closed entity... I mean it is, but it isn't...

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Channel 5 come on. 

"This is one of those cases where you may want to keep your phone handy next to your bed and have your alerts turned on," Burnett said.

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Sitting here in the middle of RI...weathermen keep mentioning the chance of a spinup overnight/tomorrow morning...but they usually don’t even mention it when we are at a marginal risk.

Big chance?

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