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WxWatcher007

Harvey - Main Thread

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1 minute ago, Master of Disaster said:

I think a better statement should have been. If water is entering your home, leave!! Do not remain there. 

Like Katrina, there are a lot of people with no place to go.

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1 minute ago, Master of Disaster said:

Just heard one official state "just because water is entering your home, that doesn't make it an emergency. Do not call 911 for that". That may be the single dumbest statement I have heard released from an official yet. So at what point does water entering the home become an emergency? 4 feet? 6 feet? Wtf???

Totally disagree with you on this statement.  Metro Houston has 4 million people.  Probably 10,000 people have water in their homes right now.  911 backed up with over 1000 calls.  Because you have some water in your home does not make it a 911 call in an unprecedented emergency.  Yes if you are next to an overflowing bayou and water is rising rapidly, that is a different story.   911 has to pick and choose who they can help...

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2 minutes ago, Master of Disaster said:

I think a better statement should have been. If water is entering your home, leave!! Do not remain there. 

And get swept away and die in the current?

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2 minutes ago, ZackH said:

That's not stupid at all. If your life is not in danger, then you are wasting resources and time for those who's lives actually are in danger. If you have water coming in your house, it is not a life threatening situation yet. Rescue personnel only need to focus on those in life threatening situation at this point. 

Yeah I mean what is 911 going to do for you in that case when they're busy rescuing people in danger of imminent drowning? They'll tell you to leave or go to your roof and wait

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Let's get this straight leaving is bad and only an option if water is overtaking your whole home, flooding in a home regardless as to how high it is, is an emergency. Although an emergency it is not life-threatening and therefore limited rescue services should be elsewhere.

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1 minute ago, ZackH said:

And get swept away and die in the current?

This is worse than Katrina in a way cause the water is moving.

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1 minute ago, Amped said:

Like Katrina, there are a lot of people with no place to go.

1.3 million approx in the greater NO metro - and it was really only the city that got totally flooded out in Katrina.

6.5 million in the Houston metro area - and it's all affected by this. 

I'm hopeful there will be a lesser loss of life this time, but the total cost and devastation and number of people impacted may be far worse.

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29 minutes ago, oceanas said:

I-45 N @ Calvacade. (This is Calvacade. 45 is the elevated structure in the background) I'm 6'3" and standing on the curb the water was up to my waist. Didn't want to see how high it was if stepped in the road. Little White Oak bayou runs along the feeder/access road to 45 and is out of its banks here. There is a very strong current.

20170827_101046.jpg

 

houston1.PNG

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1 minute ago, mackerel_sky said:

The mayor saying " there were too many people to evacuate "" seems like a moronic statement . 

They would need more than 72 hours to even debate evacuation but mandatory evacuation around the lower areas should have happened.

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20 minutes ago, LakeEffectKing said:

This will be the costliest natural disaster in US history.  And "if" Harvey is able to get off the coast for 24 hrs., this will re-energize the moisture feed, lift, convergence in and around the HOU area.  This is their armageddon. :(

Hearing you say this gave me chills up and down my spine. We all knew, well most of us knew the potential with this after the models were locked in for days. Literally all the guidance, with very little if any waivering spelled out this disaster. We try to hope for the best and that the guidance is wrong, but when an ensemble mean is spitting out 20"+ for four days straight, you've been sufficiently  warned.

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One thing about mandatory evacuations, as I've participated in a few as a firefighter, you cannot legally force someone to abandon their property. People at the Jersey shore during Sandy were told that nobody would be coming to rescue them, and still many stayed.

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Just WRT evacuating Houston, over 100 people died in the evacuation from Rita in 2005 (many times more than actually died in the storm itself), so there is historical precedence against that. The whole thing is basically between a rock and a hard place.

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2 minutes ago, Master of Disaster said:

Better than drowning in your home. If I have water entering my home, I am not staying. Period. I would rather take my chances looking for higher ground then to drown inside my home like 1000 New Orleans residents did. That considering the fact that if I was in a flood prone area I wouldn't have stayed anyway. Personal accountability has to play at least some roll here. 

Higher ground is getting to your roof, not wondering off into the flood water. 

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Speaking of flooding in homes.. Pic looking out on my sister's front lawn.

First floor has a couple of inches, so they moved to the 2nd. The whole subdivision if flooded, so they have nowhere they can go. If it starts getting high in the house, they will be some of the people calling 911 for rescue.

 

IMG_0481.jpg

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7 minutes ago, mackerel_sky said:

The mayor saying " there were too many people to evacuate "" seems like a moronic statement . 

Evacuating 2+ million people on 2-3 days notice is logistically impossible

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1 minute ago, andyhb said:

Just WRT evacuating Houston, over 100 people died in the evacuation from Rita in 2005 (many times more than actually died in the storm itself), so there is historical precedence against that. The whole thing is basically between a rock and a hard place.

Houston is the 4th largest US city, and it's also one of the largest if not largest area wise. It would have been impossible, especially since the lead time was relatively short. A little over a week ago we were watching a remnant low over Mexico.

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Just now, Upper Level LOL said:

Evacuating 2+ million people on 2-3 days notice is logistically impossible

Houston has 6 million people.

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5 minutes ago, Master of Disaster said:

Better than drowning in your home. If I have water entering my home, I am not staying. Period. I would rather take my chances looking for higher ground then to drown inside my home like 1000 New Orleans residents did. That considering the fact that if I was in a flood prone area I wouldn't have stayed anyway. Personal accountability has to play at least some roll here. 

Well, no matter what you would do (which would be not smart), the advice the official gave is 150% correct.

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Just now, dan11295 said:

HRRR at least shows Houston Metro drying out for a bit after 20-21z

That won't stop the rivers from rising, too much damage has already been done.

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Just now, SnoSki14 said:

That won't stop the rivers from rising, too much damage has already been done.

 

And the HRRR refires everything right over Houston metro by midevening. It may be a brief respite....but not going to avert the massive crisis already upon us

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