Jump to content
  • Member Statistics

    15,393
    Total Members
    7,904
    Most Online
    NW_of_GYX
    Newest Member
    NW_of_GYX
    Joined
WxWatcher007

Harvey - Main Thread

Recommended Posts

Well, my relatives are waiting for the next boat out of their area.  They are just outside the mandatory evac zone at this time and are using a neighbor's boat (along with a lot of other people on their block).  They are over 1 mile from the Brazos and I believe the levee is 58 feet high, but not taking chances. Unreal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Hoosier said:

Well, my relatives are waiting for the next boat out of their area.  They are just outside the mandatory evac zone at this time and are using a neighbor's boat (along with a lot of other people on their block).  They are over 1 mile from the Brazos and I believe the levee is 58 feet high, but not taking chances. Unreal.

Glad they're safe and getting out of dodge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems you always hear about these dams being stressed/possibly failing and it never happens. You just wonder if it's ever going to happen this would likely be when it does. I'm just unsure how all these dam structures could support such a rain event. If they do, I tip my hat to the engineers.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Mountain_Patch said:

Just noticed Addicks hasn't reported since 4:55 CST 

I noticed about an hour ago. I keep refreshing and checking other sites. I can't find another update since then. WTF?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems the Houston levees are holding up remarkably well, despite a really overwhelming stress test.

It stands in striking contrast to the New Orleans experience

Kudos to the people who designed and built the Houston system, they did great work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Mountain_Patch said:

I think they're freaking out so they're going to push it to the limit. Notice how the press doesn't even ask a single question. I sometimes want to slam my head against the wall.

Of course they are freaking out, the inflow into the reservior is still much higher than the outflow they are releasing, even if they increase the flows (already higher than designed to handle) the inflow is still more. At this point, they should really be concerned with the spillway and surrounding neighborhoods. I can't believe as something as important as a possible dam failure, the media hasn't asked more questions, totally irresponsible. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe they said discharges out of Addicks and Barker are 8k cf/s max (not sure if that's a combined total or separate totals) with current discharge at 5.5k cf/s. Seems like Cyprus creek is still flowing into Addicks pretty bad and overall inflows are nowhere near what they can discharge. These are earthen dams almost 90 years old and the spillway points seem suspect with just a meager concrete topping used for reinforcement. Not sure what lays beneath the surface of these dams as far as quality concrete or stone or if the "spillway" points have ever been rebuilt in the past few decades. As far as spillways go they look very weak.. more like your average neighborhood drainage ditch than something designed to not be undercut when they are topped.

Doesn't help that Addicks isn't reporting water levels anymore also. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, SeanBarg said:

I believe they said discharges out of Addicks and Barker are 8k cf/s max (not sure if that's a combined total or separate totals) with current discharge at 5.5k cf/s. Seems like Cyprus creek is still flowing into Addicks pretty bad and overall inflows are nowhere near what they can discharge. These are earthen dams almost 90 years old and the spillway points seem quite weak with just a meager concrete topping used for reinforcement. Not sure what lays beneath the surface of these dams as far as quality concrete or stone or if the "spillway" points have ever been rebuilt in the past few decades. As far as spillways go they look very weak.. more like your average neighborhood drainage ditch than something designed to not be undercut when they are topped.

Doesn't help that Addicks isn't reporting water levels anymore also. 

Corp of Engineers is suppose to have a press conference in the next 30 minutes or so.  Hopefully they will let everyone know what is going on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, HKY_WX said:

It seems you always hear about these dams being stressed/possibly failing and it never happens. You just wonder if it's ever going to happen this would likely be when it does. I'm just unsure how all these dam structures could support such a rain event. If they do, I tip my hat to the engineers.

Because the engineers design these dams to hold max capacity and spillway flows. Just like any engineering, your calculations have a calculated failure point beyond the theoritical failing point, and you build it to handle 1.5X or more to handle it. Most dam designs nowadays usually only potentially fail if the spillways erode the dam to the point of failure, even now designs are taken this into consideration. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, NJwx85 said:

A large amount of the press thought the water would have receded by now, and I wonder where they were getting their forecast from. It seems some are still in denial.

Not sure about the forecast they are looking at, but I can see why so many people thought waters were going to drop quickly.  Houston's setup of bayous and highways-as-backup-bayous is really good at moving lots of water very fast.  People have gotten used to seeing 4"+ drenching storms flood stuff and then disappear.  Houstonians grouse about how it floods at the drop of a hat without realizing that's the system working as designed to divert overflow that would have gone into neighborhoods into the road system instead.  On the roads blocking transportation, it is very visible and annoying, but only briefly:  it's then gone without leaving the lingering damage issues it would have otherwise caused and usually before serious issues arise from having lost use of your highways for vehicle transportation.

 

Then we get an event like this, which way exceeds the capacities of that type of system, and boom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What an absolutely unbelievable storm, especially from a meteorlogical perspective.  I went through Sandy which was very special in its own right, but Harvey is a damn acrobat.  Regenerating out of an open wave to bust every strength forecast, hitting Texas with such a perfect structure, taking something like a day to lose hurricane status.  Then stalling and loosing one horrible band after another with heavy lightning and tornadic cells and historic rain.  And it's far from over.  And it's not settled what it's even going to do.  And it's an open question if this is already our costliest natural disaster ever.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is late, but from Jeff Lindner about 30 min ago:

 

Quote

Mandatory evacuation order for both Inverness Forest and Northgate subdivisions. 

Also, 

Flow is likely to engage the N end Addicks spillway within the next 12 hours. This will be uncontrolled water flow into the areas of Twin Lakes, Lakes of Eldridge, Lakes of Eldridge North

Mandatory evac for much of Fort Bend levees…leave now

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Harvey was what you would get if a bunch of meteorologists got drunk, someone was scribbling on a napkin and "hey guys what do you think of this sounding!" and they started throwing what-ifs then got to arguing over what it would take physics-wise to make that actually WORK meteorologically and that's how we ended up with this Calvin+Hobbes "the car wreck happened to be on the train tracks so the train comes along and crunches then the plane overhead falls out of the sky and triggers an earthquake" scenario.

 

It was a thing of meteorological beauty but I still would have been happy to have it remain a purely theoretical Happy Hour napkin scribble.

 

 

  • Like 13

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never been to Houston but how much wildlife is in those huge reservoir areas?  Just Google Earthed them.  Looks like they are usually dry or if there is a storm there are places for deer and other wildlife to go.  I guess if they fill up all that wildlife has to go into subdivisions around the area?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, wxeyeNH said:

I have never been to Houston but how much wildlife is in those huge reservoir areas?  Just Google Earthed them.  Looks like they are usually dry or if there is a storm there are places for deer and other wildlife to go.  I guess if they fill up all that wildlife has to go into subdivisions around the area?  

One of the evacuees mentioned seeing a number of dead animals in the water in her area like opossums, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oddly enough I checked a bunch of the traffic cams and I swear I see less flooding on the main roads than I did yesterday morning but that doesn't necessarily mean residential areas aren't worse because I'm sure they are 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A chemical leak warning has been issued near Houston

https://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2017/08/28/us/28reuters-storm-harvey-chemical-leak.html?partner=IFTTT&_r=0

(Reuters) - Texas authorities on Monday issued a chemical leak warning in the La Porte and Shoreacres regions of the state, advising citizens to remain sheltered and turn off air conditioning.

La Porte and Shoreacres are about 25 miles (40 km) from downtown Houston which is seeing catastrophic flooding from Harvey, the most powerful hurricane in more than 50 years to hit the state.

The La Porte Fire Department was working on a leak from a pipeline in the area and La Porte was sheltered in place for the northeast section of the city, Harris County Homeland security and Emergency Management said on its website. (http://bit.ly/2iDGMTl)

(Reporting by Ismail Shakil in Bengaluru; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How is this thing still a tropical storm? This thing made landfall last week.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, SharonA said:

 

Harvey was what you would get if a bunch of meteorologists got drunk, someone was scribbling on a napkin and "hey guys what do you think of this sounding!" and they started throwing what-ifs then got to arguing over what it would take physics-wise to make that actually WORK meteorologically and that's how we ended up with this Calvin+Hobbes "the car wreck happened to be on the train tracks so the train comes along and crunches then the plane overhead falls out of the sky and triggers an earthquake" scenario.

 

It was a thing of meteorological beauty but I still would have been happy to have it remain a purely theoretical Happy Hour napkin scribble.

 

 

"And... and then it stalls for four days!"

"Shut up Beven, call an Uber and go home, you're drunk."

"And nobody calls for mandatory evacuations!"

"Someone take Beven's keys!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, TriPol said:

A chemical leak warning has been issued near Houston

https://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2017/08/28/us/28reuters-storm-harvey-chemical-leak.html?partner=IFTTT&_r=0

(Reuters) - Texas authorities on Monday issued a chemical leak warning in the La Porte and Shoreacres regions of the state, advising citizens to remain sheltered and turn off air conditioning.

La Porte and Shoreacres are about 25 miles (40 km) from downtown Houston which is seeing catastrophic flooding from Harvey, the most powerful hurricane in more than 50 years to hit the state.

The La Porte Fire Department was working on a leak from a pipeline in the area and La Porte was sheltered in place for the northeast section of the city, Harris County Homeland security and Emergency Management said on its website. (http://bit.ly/2iDGMTl)

(Reporting by Ismail Shakil in Bengaluru; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

You know you're dealing with monsoonal flooding when your report relies on a writer in Bangalore...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×