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Summer Banter & General Discussion/Observations

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1 hour ago, Damage In Tolland said:

Models say summer starts Thursday. We're almost there. Two more days of highs near 50 and it's finally over

drunk?

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21 minutes ago, Damage In Tolland said:

Just keep hanging and descending from the trees. These are hanging by silk threads , 

http://02B88611-D6E8-40E8-80FE-615A746BF511_zps

it's disgusting.  Sounds like rain in the woods here.

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28 minutes ago, radarman said:

it's disgusting.  Sounds like rain in the woods here.

Yeah feeding frenzy this weekend. Very noticeable especially on the white Oaks 

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20 hours ago, powderfreak said:

We wish it was about 5C colder right now with  a favorable orographic set up over the mountains.  

IMG_6062.GIF.d73ec747f469e1cf7c4ee9d6ad963946.GIF

So close yet so far... would've been a sweet upslope event if a few degrees Celsius colder.

High of 40F with low of 35F and over an inch of orographic rain yesterday.  5F colder and might have been a paste job.  

Looking at models no one would've forecast an inch of rain yesterday up there.  Down in town: only 0.04".  

 

Daily Hydrometeorological Data
National Weather Service Burlington VT
634 PM EDT Sat Jun 3 2017

Station            Precip   Temperature   Present         Snow
                   24 Hrs   Max Min Cur   Weather     New Total SWE
...Vermont...
Mount Mansfield     1.09    40  35  40   Light rain

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As gross as they are, I'd almost rather have gypsy moth or tent caterpillars than Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) as the former species usually doesn't kill trees unless there are repeat infestations. Plus, caterpillars are vulnerable to fungi and predation, whereas EAB reproduces pretty much unchecked. Without a natural control agent, EAB is decimating our ash population and the visible damage gets worse each successive year after it was first detected here in 2012.

Extensive damage is evident on the ash trees from EAB in this aerial photo I took with my drone yesterday by Onota Lake in Pittsfield. Notice all of the bare or mostly bare trees as ash species (mostly white ash) comprise a significant portion of our woodlands. Even the late blooming ash trees should be leafed out by now, and those that are still at least somewhat alive have done so. If EAB hasn't arrived at your location yet, it probably will soon as it is spreading rapidly.

Screen_Shot_2017-06-04_at_5_35.09_PM.png

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15 hours ago, wxmanmitch said:

As gross as they are, I'd almost rather have gypsy moth or tent caterpillars than Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) as the former species usually doesn't kill trees unless there are repeat infestations. Plus, caterpillars are vulnerable to fungi and predation, whereas EAB reproduces pretty much unchecked. Without a natural control agent, EAB is decimating our ash population and the visible damage gets worse each successive year after it was first detected here in 2012.

Extensive damage is evident on the ash trees from EAB in this aerial photo I took with my drone yesterday by Onota Lake in Pittsfield. Notice all of the bare or mostly bare trees as ash species (mostly white ash) comprise a significant portion of our woodlands. Even the late blooming ash trees should be leafed out by now, and those that are still at least somewhat alive have done so. If EAB hasn't arrived at your location yet, it probably will soon as it is spreading rapidly.

The sad irony is that, in my NNJ experience (1970s) at least, white ash was about only thing the gypsy moths didn't eat - they'd start with the white oak group, move to other oaks as the outbreak spread, then to other hardwoods.  (The only native conifer in our particular area was Eastern redcedar, which is almost bug-proof.)   There are some native predators on EAB, mainly non-stinging wasps, but they haven't slowed the exotic bug's progress.  However, EAB was confirmed in the CON area 4 years ago (may be a year off), and though the infestation was on a county bordering Maine, the insect has not yet been detected east of the line.  Seems inevitable that it will continue to spread, and we know that NNE cold will provide no protection - one of our forest certification auditors lives in Sault St. Marie, ON and he said 3 years ago that the ash is all dead there.

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4 minutes ago, ineedsnow said:

How could you not want to atleast watch it... Thats not something you see all the time lol

He's really focused on having a better lawn than Lava Rock.

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The fence is definitely wonky though. It's leaning quite a bit on the left side of the image and straightens out toward the corner.

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16 hours ago, wxmanmitch said:

As gross as they are, I'd almost rather have gypsy moth or tent caterpillars than Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) as the former species usually doesn't kill trees unless there are repeat infestations. Plus, caterpillars are vulnerable to fungi and predation, whereas EAB reproduces pretty much unchecked. Without a natural control agent, EAB is decimating our ash population and the visible damage gets worse each successive year after it was first detected here in 2012.

Extensive damage is evident on the ash trees from EAB in this aerial photo I took with my drone yesterday by Onota Lake in Pittsfield. Notice all of the bare or mostly bare trees as ash species (mostly white ash) comprise a significant portion of our woodlands. Even the late blooming ash trees should be leafed out by now, and those that are still at least somewhat alive have done so. If EAB hasn't arrived at your location yet, it probably will soon as it is spreading rapidly.

Screen_Shot_2017-06-04_at_5_35.09_PM.png

I have been treating my 2 massive green ash trees on my property for the last 4 years as soon as EAB was reported nearby. A 20 dollar bottle of Dominion 2L with 21% imdoclorpid and a soil drench/basal trunk spray has kept them healthy so far. Cost $10 a year to treat them. 

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1 hour ago, weathafella said:

Screams photoshop fake.  Notice the surrounding "terrain"

That's what gives it away. Lush lawn with a high plains desert other side of fence. No way 

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Re: the gypsy moth caterpillars, I have seen some dead caterpillars on leave with that funky inverted "v" droop going on.  I'm told that is from the fungus.

No leaf damage so far, a few of the buggers around, but def. many more tent caterpillars than gypsy moth.

 

Re: the lawn mowing tornado pic, from what I have seen it is legit.  I could see CT Blizz doing that...applying LESCO while his neighborhood gets demolished

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20 minutes ago, Damage In Tolland said:

That's what gives it away. Lush lawn with a high plains desert other side of fence. No way 

Ever been to the SW US? lol

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22 minutes ago, Damage In Tolland said:

That's what gives it away. Lush lawn with a high plains desert other side of fence. No way 

lol....you obviously have not travelled well.  There's lots of cities/suburbs that interface with the plains like that.  It's not like the country is one large suburbia.  Take a look at Google Earth at a place like Denver - I found lots of examples of houses sitting on the edge of the high plains like that.

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2 minutes ago, eekuasepinniW said:

Another jackpot for you.  Only .12" here.

The backside post holes are filled back up to near the top. I think the I93 widening may actually be finished before the run.

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19 minutes ago, HoarfrostHubb said:

Re: the gypsy moth caterpillars, I have seen some dead caterpillars on leave with that funky inverted "v" droop going on.  I'm told that is from the fungus.

No leaf damage so far, a few of the buggers around, but def. many more tent caterpillars than gypsy moth.

 

Re: the lawn mowing tornado pic, from what I have seen it is legit.  I could see CT Blizz doing that...applying LESCO while his neighborhood gets demolished

Happy Birthday Hunch. The big 45!

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15 minutes ago, MetHerb said:

lol....you obviously have not travelled well.  There's lots of cities/suburbs that interface with the plains like that.  It's not like the country is one large suburbia.  Take a look at Google Earth at a place like Denver - I found lots of examples of houses sitting on the edge of the high plains like that.

I have traveled a lot and yes you can go suburban to desert I find it odd that there is no transition in this case.  That guys house could be at the edge of development but I'm skeptical.

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