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TheJMan

Start to Meteorology

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All, 

      I have been lurking on this website for over a year now.  I recently moved to Central New Jersey I guess you could call it (Joint Base MDL) in late 2015.  I came from Guam which was amazing and had its fair share of typhoons.  I would sit at work and go to the NOAA website for the pacific and try to predict when we will see another typhoon, and those that were live, which direction it would go.  I have always been fascinated with weather and always will be.  I am 10 years into the Air Force and though I do love my job (OSHA and EPA for the Air Force) I just really enjoy weather.  I am almost finished with my bachelors in environmental science and was curious how did you all start?  What schools or programs out there could get my foot in the door?  I read each post in the Mid-Atlantic, Philly, and New York metro daily learning each day about the maps, and the forecasts and love it.  I just told my mother last week that upstate South Carolina may get slammed with snow, and she didn’t believe me.  From all your posts and observations I was right on the money and they got almost 5 inches.  Any guidance is greatly appreciated, and I thank you all for what you do.  You may see me post from time to time in those forums above, but don’t mind me, I am still learning!

John

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If you are up to the challenge of taking the required courses maybe you could cross-train and transfer to a weather position within the Air Force.

The BAS in Meteorology is a Unique Program Open to those with a CCAF in Meteorology from the United States Air Force:

http://bas.atmo.arizona.edu/

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I have read this site on a regular basis and although I can read and understand some of what you METS talk about and I can check out model runs but damn if I am clueless as to what  these are so excuse my ignorance but what is a------->positive nao ? A negative ao ? and what the heck is a pna ?  I am just trying my best to learn and understand ,,,,thanks in advance

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20 minutes ago, Brasiluvsnow said:

I have read this site on a regular basis and although I can read and understand some of what you METS talk about and I can check out model runs but damn if I am clueless as to what  these are so excuse my ignorance but what is a------->positive nao ? A negative ao ? and what the heck is a pna ?  I am just trying my best to learn and understand ,,,,thanks in advance

Happy reading.

https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/teleconnections/nao/

https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/teleconnections/pna/

http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/daily_ao_index/teleconnections.shtml

 

 

 

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I'm really interested in being able to help like the big weather casting companies like accuweather and weatherbug in helping them with the weather for North Central Iowa areas and northern Illinois areas also. I did take 4 years of high school weather and I'm wanting to be able to further my ambition in predicting the weather. I have been interested in the weather since I was about 10 years old. I have always followed the weather on TV and now I pay for the accuweather premium so I can get my maps and models that I need to help with predicting the weather for this area just for family members. I used to help out Super walmart up in Maquoketa Iowa during the years of 2008 - 2010. My mom worked for Walmart at that time and walmart would actually call me to find out what was going to happen with the weather for that day or if their were any storms or anything coming their way. It was great to be able to do that and be able to help keep people safe and out of harms way. 

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On 12/5/2017 at 10:51 PM, Brasiluvsnow said:

ok I know war is a card game but what the heck is W A R ? thanks in advance

Western Atlantic Ridge

14 hours ago, Brasiluvsnow said:

Are the Global models strictly used for long range and are Mesoscale pretty much short range models ? If I have this wrong could someone explain the difference ? Thanks in advance 

Global Models tend to have a much lower resolution than Mesoscale models. Global models in the long range have a variety of issues. To simplify things, lets look at it this way: Global models are used to show the thousand foot view of all the weather players which are interacting with each other. Mesoscale models, on the other hand, are used to look at the finer details and to help pinpoint small scale features such as banding during snow storms. Mesoscale tend to be short range models, however, due to the fact that they tend to have a much higher resolution than that of their counterparts (globals). This resolution, though, gives rise to several issues. First, its the chaos theory. Within this theory is the butterfly effect which states that a simple mistake early on leads to significant mistakes later on. With higher resolutions, these mistakes are amplified further due to the fact that higher resolutions use a much higher computation speed (more equations). On the other hand, while globals may not have these limitations, they do not have the resolution to "see" many of the intricacies which the meso models can. As such, globals tend to miss things which are limited by their resolution. This, consequently, allows globals to miss intricacies which can likewise lead to large discrepancies towards the end of the run, though this does not happen as often. 

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3 hours ago, USCG RS said:

Western Atlantic Ridge

Global Models tend to have a much lower resolution than Mesoscale models. Global models in the long range have a variety of issues. To simplify things, lets look at it this way: Global models are used to show the thousand foot view of all the weather players which are interacting with each other. Mesoscale models, on the other hand, are used to look at the finer details and to help pinpoint small scale features such as banding during snow storms. Mesoscale tend to be short range models, however, due to the fact that they tend to have a much higher resolution than that of their counterparts (globals). This resolution, though, gives rise to several issues. First, its the chaos theory. Within this theory is the butterfly effect which states that a simple mistake early on leads to significant mistakes later on. With higher resolutions, these mistakes are amplified further due to the fact that higher resolutions use a much higher computation speed (more equations). On the other hand, while globals may not have these limitations, they do not have the resolution to "see" many of the intricacies which the meso models can. As such, globals tend to miss things which are limited by their resolution. This, consequently, allows globals to miss intricacies which can likewise lead to large discrepancies towards the end of the run, though this does not happen as often. 

RS-----> I am trying my best to learn this stuff, thanks so much that was very easy to understand and I appreciate that you replied to my other question as well ! Its Brutal out stay warm thanks again.

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