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bluewave

First Below Zero Day In NYC Since 1994

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We have now a 73 degree temperature range this winter, which has to be near a record for Central Park,

 

Yea, I was looking at the winter of 33-34, and the max temp was 14.4C, which would also give us a range of 73F (-15 to 58).

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Good point, I would think so.  According to the NYT, it swells to about 3.1mm every workday.

 

http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/06/03/commuters-nearly-double-manhattans-daytime-population-census-says/

NYC had plenty of train commuters in 1934; not so many automobile commuters as the Robert Moses parkway system was in its infancy, and the Triborough Bridge opened just after NYC's record high temperature in July 1936. Plenty hot that day too.

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Yea, I was looking at the winter of 33-34, and the max temp was 14.4C, which would also give us a range of 73F (-15 to 58).

Are you using December 6 to March 6 for your met winter that year?

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I was doing Dec 1 1933 to Feb 28 1934

Thanks. I personally use the sixth day of the months in question for seasons but it probably doesn't make much difference. My thinking is that there are more likely to be high end extremes during December 1-5 than March 1-5.

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i would think way back then the heat island effect would not be as great as it is today.. that would also help to lower temps back then and of course no climate change factored in like it is today...

I'm not sure how long Albany has been doing RAOBS, but if it's been for more than 50-60 years it's telling for sure that the -30C was a record and NYC only made it to -1. That would give evidence for sure the heat island argument is legit. As others have said before, it may be more likely the development in NERN NJ is to blame than NYC urbknzation itself. This morning Long Island was 0-3 at the same time BDR and HVN were -4 to -6. If a 15 mile wide body of water can modify temps like that, so can upstream development in areas like Bergen or Passaic county compared to 60 plus years ago

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We have now a 73 degree temperature range this winter, which has to be near a record for Central Park,

Just another amazing statistic for this winter. I was thinking how we could go for the 100 degree seasonal swing this summer with a 100 (or actually, a 99) degree reading. But I think 73 degree swing in the same season is more impressive.

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Just another amazing statistic for this winter. I was thinking how we could go for the 100 degree seasonal swing this summer with a 100 (or actually, a 99) degree reading. But I think 73 degree swing in the same season is more impressive.

1977 went from -2 in January to 104 in July...1934 was -15 in February and 101 in June......1917-18 was -13 and 104 in August...

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Does anyone have a listing of the low temperatures from reporting stations around the NYC Metro area for this morning?

 

I do not see this on the OKX NWS site.

 

-2 F here in Wood Ridge, NJ

 

Thanks!

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1977 went from -2 in January to 104 in July...1934 was -15 in February and 101 in June......1917-18 was -13 and 104 in August...

Wow. I think the 1917-18 record is untouchable. Basically we would have to hit 117 this summer.

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Thanks. I personally use the sixth day of the months in question for seasons but it probably doesn't make much difference. My thinking is that there are more likely to be high end extremes during December 1-5 than March 1-5.

 

I use Dec 8th to Mar 8th, as I'm pretty sure those are the 3 coldest months of the year, since the avg. temp on both 12/8 and 3/8 is 39.9F, so the sum is 79.8F and every other combo (like 12/6 to 3/6 or 12/1 to 3/1) is more than that and gets greater the further away from 12/8 and 3/8.  Only slight problem is if one wanted a true "winter" one would need it to be 91+ days long to be truly 1/4 of the year, but that's quibbling.  

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Averaging in this frigid weekend this is now through today "only" the second warmest meteorological winter in history, dropping below the nightmare winter of 2001/02. The tally is now 41.5 in 2001/02 vs 41.1 for  this winter.

Even if it does end up the warmest ever it still blows away 2001/02. That was a cold and snow lovers nightmare.

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In addition to yesterday's -1° reading, NYC also had a record low maximum temperature of 15° for the date. That broke the previous record of 17° set in 1979. It was the coldest daily maximum temperature since January 10, 2004 when the temperature also peaked at 15° and the coldest February maximum reading since a 13° high temperature on February 17, 1979.

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It was also the first time since 1985 that NYC went below zero after going above 70 in the winter.

This winter had a greater +- daily departure range than NYC did back in 1985.

 

12/24/15....72/63...+33

2/14/16......15/-1....-28

 

12/29/84....70/55...+30

1/21/85......9/-2......-27

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It was also the first time since 1985 that NYC went below zero after going above 70 in the winter.

This winter had a greater +- daily departure range than NYC did back in 1985.

 

12/24/15....72/63...+33

2/14/16......15/-1....-28

 

12/29/84....70/55...+30

1/21/85......9/-2......-27

1985 went up to 75 in Feb. after the -2 in January...I don't think that ever happen before...

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1985 went up to 75 in Feb. after the -2 in January...I don't think that ever happen before...

 

Yeah, the other oddity about this event was that it occurred during a very strong El Nino which was a first.

All the other times going back to 1900 ,according to the ERRST V4 reconstruction DJF, were mostly

La Ninas, neutrals, or weaker El Ninos.

 

NYC below zero winters since 1900 and DJF ONI:

 

15-16....+2.3 NDJ so far

93-94....+0.1

84-85....-0.9

80-81....-0.2

76-77....+0.7

75-76....-1.5

67-68....-0.7

62-63....-0.4

60-61.....0.0

42-43....-1.4

35-36....+0.1

34-35....-0.1

33-34....-1.2

26-27....-0.4

24-25....-1.2

21-22....+0.3

19-20....+0.6

17-18....-0.6

13-14....+1.1

11-12....+1.6

03-04.....-1.0

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Does anyone have a listing of the low temperatures from reporting stations around the NYC Metro area for this morning?

 

I do not see this on the OKX NWS site.

 

-2 F here in Wood Ridge, NJ

 

Thanks!

See my post 575 (link) .

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I use Dec 8th to Mar 8th, as I'm pretty sure those are the 3 coldest months of the year, since the avg. temp on both 12/8 and 3/8 is 39.9F, so the sum is 79.8F and every other combo (like 12/6 to 3/6 or 12/1 to 3/1) is more than that and gets greater the further away from 12/8 and 3/8.  Only slight problem is if one wanted a true "winter" one would need it to be 91+ days long to be truly 1/4 of the year, but that's quibbling.  

Thanks. I'm going to start using December 8 to March 8 myself.  Using the calendar seasons summer actually comes out to be the longest season. I'm not quite sure how though.

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Yeah, the other oddity about this event was that it occurred during a very strong El Nino which was a first.

All the other times going back to 1900 ,according to the ERRST V4 reconstruction DJF, were mostly

La Ninas, neutrals, or weaker El Ninos.

 

NYC below zero winters since 1900 and DJF ONI:

 

15-16....+2.3 NDJ so far

93-94....+0.1

84-85....-0.9

80-81....-0.2

76-77....+0.7

75-76....-1.5

67-68....-0.7

62-63....-0.4

60-61.....0.0

42-43....-1.4

35-36....+0.1

34-35....-0.1

33-34....-1.2

26-27....-0.4

24-25....-1.2

21-22....+0.3

19-20....+0.6

17-18....-0.6

13-14....+1.1

11-12....+1.6

03-04.....-1.0

Good point. But in many respects this winter has not really acted the way a Super Niño typically does.  California and Arizona continue with below-normal rainfall albeit slightly below normal.  The U.S. Northeast has had snowy and cold weather in mid-winter as opposed to having to wait till almost mid-February, as happened in 1957-8, 1982-3 or never for 1972-3 and 1997-8.  The Upper Midwest hasn't really torched. December followed Super Niño patterns nicely. After that not so much.

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Good point. But in many respects this winter has not really acted the way a Super Niño typically does.  California and Arizona continue with below-normal rainfall albeit slightly below normal.  The U.S. Northeast has had snowy and cold weather in mid-winter as opposed to having to wait till almost mid-February, as happened in 1957-8, 1982-3 or never for 1972-3 and 1997-8.  The Upper Midwest hasn't really torched. December followed Super Niño patterns nicely. After that not so much.

 

Yeah, this winter is really unusual clash of different patterns. Record warming in the Arctic and rapid reversal of the 

AO from November and December setting the stage for the blizzard. The near record Kara block built back across the

pole at the same time we saw unusually active MJO for this strong of an El Nino. Add to this the record Nino

warmth extending west into region 4. The PDO also was the highest in January for such a strong El Nino.

 

We can't forget a rare January hurricane in the Atlantic with extremely warm SST's there. That ridge off the

East Coast looks like it helped squeeze the PV down into our area instead of exiting east off the Canadian Maritimes.

So we got a direct Arctic discharge instead of a glancing blow.

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Yeah, this winter is really unusual clash of different patterns. Record warming in the Arctic and rapid reversal of the 

AO from November and December setting the stage for the blizzard. The near record Kara block built back across the

pole at the same time we saw unusually active MJO for this strong of an El Nino. Add to this the record Nino

warmth extending west into region 4. The PDO also was the highest in January for such a strong El Nino.

 

We can't forget a rare January hurricane in the Atlantic with extremely warm SST's there. That ridge off the

East Coast looks like it helped squeeze the PV down into our area instead of exiting east off the Canadian Maritimes.

So we got a direct Arctic discharge instead of a glancing blow.

I thought strong MJO's were part and parcel of strong Niños, no?

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