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MaineJayhawk

NNE Autumn 2013 Thread

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I wanted to try a milky way shot but every night has seen too many clouds around. I am hoping that won't be the case tonight as that pesky Quebec low moves out.

Sounds tasty.

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Shot this tonight from the Roosevelt Highway which crosses over to Grand Isle and South Hero. It was a great night with clear skies and no moon before Midnight.

 

 

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Shot this tonight from the Roosevelt Highway which crosses over to Grand Isle and South Hero. It was a great night with clear skies and no moon before Midnight.

 

Fantastic shot.

 

What kind of equipment did you use to get that? I've always wondered how my camera would do (knowing that I would almost certainly need a longer lens).

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Fantastic shot.

 

What kind of equipment did you use to get that? I've always wondered how my camera would do (knowing that I would almost certainly need a longer lens).

 

Nikon D300 at 24mm. 1600 ISO, f2.8, 20 second exposure (don't want to go longer than that or you will get noticeable trails). The issue is finding a non-light polluted open southerly view. Also there was some post processing in lightroom.

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This was most likely a case (and probably confirmed by the picture Jayhawk posted) of undercast. That narrow stripe is caused by air moving around MWN, not over it. You get the mountain waves where air travels over the rest of the Whites, but MWN was above the cloud layer and thus air was moving around the peak. The disturbance created by the mountain propagates downstream with the flow.

On a larger scale you see this quite often in the Pacific, where the trade wind inversion (large subsidence inversion) does the blocking and islands act as rocks in a river.

clouds-juan-fernandez-110531-02.jpg?1320

Flow will tend to go around the land rather than over, creating clear slots downstream.

Good point. I figured the deck was higher than MWN since when the wave clouds moved in they had a glaciated look around them.

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Good point. I figured the deck was higher than MWN since when the wave clouds moved in they had a glaciated look around them.

 

They were reporting quite a bit of undercast this past week.

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Nikon D300 at 24mm. 1600 ISO, f2.8, 20 second exposure (don't want to go longer than that or you will get noticeable trails). The issue is finding a non-light polluted open southerly view. Also there was some post processing in lightroom.

 

I'm a very amateur photographer, still quite the learning curve for me. I did just get Lightroom this week though.

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Foliage getting closer to peak out this way.  This is a hillside near town from like 800ft-1,500ft elevation.  The hill in the back tops out at 2,300ft.

 

 

This is looking towards Elmore Mountain from West Hill in Stowe...

 

post-352-0-77376700-1380475415.jpg

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They were reporting quite a bit of undercast this past week.

Was that sat image from the 24th or 25th? I think my glaciated Sc wave cloud obs were from 9/24 so I probably have the wrong day anyways. I see the frequent BKN/// obs from the 25th now that I look. They were socked into the FZFG on the 24th once that lobe of higher mid level moisture rolled in.

 

Anyways, beautiful day today. The rapidly decreasing sun angle/length of day is becoming more noticeable with its influence on the weather now, like PF mentioned. We had BCFG right through about 830-900am and I actually was able to radiate down cooler than CON this AM. MAV has been trending slowly cooler for tonight as well. Looks like a splendid stretch of boring Indian Summer this week.

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Was that sat image from the 24th or 25th? I think my glaciated Sc wave cloud obs were from 9/24 so I probably have the wrong day anyways. I see the frequent BKN/// obs from the 25th now that I look. They were socked into the FZFG on the 24th once that lobe of higher mid level moisture rolled in.

 

Anyways, beautiful day today. The rapidly decreasing sun angle/length of day is becoming more noticeable with its influence on the weather now, like PF mentioned. We had BCFG right through about 830-900am and I actually was able to radiate down cooler than CON this AM. MAV has been trending slowly cooler for tonight as well. Looks like a splendid stretch of boring Indian Summer this week.

 

I think you're right. Our post shows up as the 25th with "today" wording, so my guess is you were talking about the 24th. We did have several days of overcast on MWN and mountain wave clouds before that satellite image I believe.

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Foliage getting closer to peak out this way.  This is a hillside near town from like 800ft-1,500ft elevation.  The hill in the back tops out at 2,300ft.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_6972_edited-2.jpg

 

This is looking towards Elmore Mountain from West Hill in Stowe...

 

post-352-0-77376700-1380475415.jpg

 

Very nice! Amazing how fast it changes.

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Very nice! Amazing how fast it changes.

Too fast. The foliage season in Northern New England is incredibly short (although more brilliant) compared to points south.

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Too fast. The foliage season in Northern New England is incredibly short (although more brilliant) compared to points south.

I'm more amazed at how much of a difference the sun makes in vibrancy of colors. Stuff was real dull for our cloudy week, now with two sunny days it has exploded.

Everything I've read has shown long, prolonged dry, sunny weather is the ticket to great leaves...and this fall's experience so fat has shown that to be true. Rain brings leaves down, but also leaches color from the leaves.

"The reds and purples found during the fall are due to the anthocyanin compounds. These are produced when sugars combine with compounds called anthocyanidins. Because anthocyanins need sugar for their creation, weather conditions that favor sugar production - i.e., photosynthesis - are essential. Bright, sunny fall days produce the best colors. Very little photosynthesis will occur on cloudy days while rain can actually leach out the anthocyanins and carotenoids from the leaves. Various combinations of anthocyanins and carotenoids can result in yellow, orange and red leaves all on the same tree."

That's why last Fall was off the hook..month long dry, sunny weather with huge 30-40+ diurnal ranges. This next week of sun will likely lead to widespread peak color in the hills.

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Very nice! Amazing how fast it changes.

It's funny...I saw this same area a couple days ago and the trees were all red/orange but dull.

Then the sun has come out for two days and it's like steroids were pumped into the forest. I took my photos today at noon in midday light (which usually dulls the colors) but today it didnt. That's when I know we are reaching peak...doesn't matter what time of day, it's just glowing.

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Looks like mid week will be peak color for most of NNE since the late week fropa will bring wind and some rain bringing down many leaves even in areas that have not quite reached peak. If we had another week of sun and near calm conditions the peak would be spectacular. So Wednesdays the peak day for mountain areas if you take weather into consideration.

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A spectacular weekend weather-wise in NNE, and as a result I made sure to take full advantage by hiking an old favorite of mine - North and South Baldface, featuring about 4 miles of above-treeline fun.  No stories to tell, just a wonderful day with temperatures at elevation of about 60F and a wind that varied from calm to 11 mph.  The foliage was rocking as well.  It looked like every peak except Washington was in the clear, so I hope Ryan didn't summit the Rockpile like he mentioned he might.

 

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post-254-0-98923200-1380556193_thumb.jpg

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A spectacular weekend weather-wise in NNE, and as a result I made sure to take full advantage by hiking an old favorite of mine - North and South Baldface, featuring about 4 miles of above-treeline fun.  No stories to tell, just a wonderful day with temperatures at elevation of about 60F and a wind that varied from calm to 11 mph.  The foliage was rocking as well.  It looked like every peak except Washington was in the clear, so I hope Ryan didn't summit the Rockpile like he mentioned he might.

 

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I really need to start hiking around here. What a waste of 3 years.

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Too fast. The foliage season in Northern New England is incredibly short (although more brilliant) compared to points south.

Morning report from our Ashland office:

 

Quick foliage report: northern areas past peak, good color but significant leaf drop.

 

"Northern areas" means Deboullie and Round Pond, in the Allagash/St.John country west of Fort Kent.

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Awesome shots as usual, Jayhawk.

I'm just amazed at the difference in foliage in just a few sunny days. It really is quite a treat to see this stuff every single day. This weather couldn't get any better either.

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Those Milky Way shots are insane.

I have no idea how you do that. The Rocky Ridge one is especially sweet. You should send that one to the RR country club.

 

I was thinking of doing that and thank you. I think this might be the most crisp of the series:

 

 

post-139-0-14420000-1380564710_thumb.png

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Awesome shots as usual, Jayhawk.

I'm just amazed at the difference in foliage in just a few sunny days. It really is quite a treat to see this stuff every single day. This weather couldn't get any better either.

 

Thanks :)

 

The foliage is more vibrant than my pics show - simply a matter of camera operator inexperience.  It looked like those sponge-paint pieces of artwork you make for second-grade art class.

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A spectacular weekend weather-wise in NNE, and as a result I made sure to take full advantage by hiking an old favorite of mine - North and South Baldface, featuring about 4 miles of above-treeline fun.  No stories to tell, just a wonderful day with temperatures at elevation of about 60F and a wind that varied from calm to 11 mph.  The foliage was rocking as well.  It looked like every peak except Washington was in the clear, so I hope Ryan didn't summit the Rockpile like he mentioned he might.

 

attachicon.gif1.jpg

 

attachicon.gif3.jpg

 

attachicon.gif4.jpg

 

attachicon.gif5.jpg

 

attachicon.gif6.jpg

we've done that hike too. great views all around

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Awesome shots Jayhawk! Looks like a great place to hike. Here is a better treatment of the Rocky Ridge shot.

 

 

post-139-0-47130200-1380567697_thumb.png

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