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Weather References and Newbie Information


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7 minutes ago, cg2916 said:

Where's the best place to get model soundings? I'm trying to find one with wetbulbs or at least dew point and pressure.

I use www.pivotalweather.com for point soundings from time to time. Geared more towards severe weather IMO, though.

 

If you are dedicated and don't mind a small learning curve, BUFKIT is fantastic for viewing model sounds from the NAM/GFS. 

http://www.wdtb.noaa.gov/tools/BUFKIT/ 

Once you download the program the data distribution is here: http://www.meteo.psu.edu/bufkit/CONUS_NAM_00.html

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, cg2916 said:

Where's the best place to get model soundings? I'm trying to find one with wetbulbs or at least dew point and pressure.

Some others in addition to what Tyler mentioned:

College of Dupage: on any model map image, just click on the map and it will launch a sounding for that time http://weather.cod.edu/forecast/

TwisterData: similar to Dupage, just click on the map - http://www.twisterdata.com/

 

Others for sounding or sounding data:

http://www.wxcaster.com/models_text.htm

http://vortex.plymouth.edu/myo/fx/raobfx.html

http://www.stormchaser.niu.edu/machine/textfcstsound.html

 

For observed soundings (not modeled): http://www.spc.noaa.gov/exper/soundings/

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On 12/13/2016 at 4:07 PM, cg2916 said:

Where's the best place to get model soundings? I'm trying to find one with wetbulbs or at least dew point and pressure.

As Tyler mentioned, we have clickable soundings available on pivotalweather.com. To my knowledge, we're the only site offering this for the HRRR or the 4-km NAM CONUS nest. The load times for GFS and NAM soundings should also be as fast or faster than comparable sites (under 4 sec. in most cases).

On our Skew-T Log-P panel, you can find dew point (heavy green line) and wet bulb temp (light blue line).

We use SHARPpy for the sounding graphics, which features numerous panels that can be swapped out in the code. Note that while there is a lot of information pertinent to severe weather, we have a simple algorithm that determines whether a sounding profile is "wintry" and will automatically swap out some of that in favor of info like Precip Type, snow growth efficiency, etc. That information is found at the bottom right of the sounding image.

If you have any questions or comments/requests, feel free to PM me here!

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  • jburns unpinned this topic
  • 11 months later...

Thank you for posting this.  My son (14) has in the last year really has got into weather and wants to be a meteorologist very badly.  He will spent hours looking up past weather events and studying storm tracks and why they did what they did.  What would be his best coarse for getting a jump on things, and what class's should he in high school (Next year) be his main focus?  He is a very smart kid.  Luckily he loves research, history, and math.  Thanks for any advice.   

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1 hour ago, NCWX said:

Thank you for posting this.  My son (14) has in the last year really has got into weather and wants to be a meteorologist very badly.  He will spent hours looking up past weather events and studying storm tracks and why they did what they did.  What would be his best coarse for getting a jump on things, and what class's should he in high school (Next year) be his main focus?  He is a very smart kid.  Luckily he loves research, history, and math.  Thanks for any advice.   

math, math, math, math, math.

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  • 2 weeks later...

First, congratulations to all who enjoyed a rare big snow at the coast!

On 12/24/2017 at 10:12 PM, NCWX said:

Thank you for posting this.  My son (14) has in the last year really has got into weather and wants to be a meteorologist very badly.  He will spent hours looking up past weather events and studying storm tracks and why they did what they did.  What would be his best coarse for getting a jump on things, and what class's should he in high school (Next year) be his main focus?  He is a very smart kid.  Luckily he loves research, history, and math.  Thanks for any advice.   

Math, plus chemistry and physics if they offer it. Even something like Economics helps with the thought process of modeling a complex real world.

On 12/9/2016 at 6:43 PM, AshevilleCityWx said:

I hear CAD a lot where does this exactly mean I know sometimes it works here and a lot of times it doesn't with just rain?

CAD stands for cold air damming. It is when low level cold air banks up on the east side of the Appalachians. Look for surface high pressure to the northeast keeping a northeast or north wind fetch into the Carolinas. WAA aloft should not dislodge surface cold in that situation, but the surface high must keep pushing in cold air for winter precip. Retreating high press allows WAA at the surface and just regular rain. High resolution models are best, but all models still struggle with it.

Finally CAD also occurs along other mountain ranges. The Rockies are notorious for the Plains. However it's normally snow not ice in the High Plains. There the challenge is how much to undercut MOS. Pacific Northwest can have nasty ice events when cold air drains down the Columbia River basin. It is not really CAD west of the mountains, but same principle. 

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5 minutes ago, mryanwilkes said:

What is 5H, exactly?  Even my buddy google isn't helping me out with this one...

It's an abbreviation for 500mb...the movement and evolution of upper atmosphere waves are big pieces of the puzzle when it comes to forecasting and these are most commonly tracked at the 500mb level (5H or h5).

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  • jburns unpinned this topic
  • 8 months later...
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Hi! Not sure where to put this, so feel free to remove if necessary.

I am currently a second grade teacher and have been the past twelve years and I can say I am no longer happy. Weather has always been a passion of mine, and the older I get and the less time I have left, the more I want to go for it.

However, math was always a weak spot for me. I noticed with some of the programs I am looking at, a lot of Calculus is necessary. I haven’t taken that type of math in 13 years.

For meteorologists on the board, do your have any useful tips or suggestions on how to do well on the math that comes with a weather degree? Thank you in advance.


.

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5 minutes ago, Tigerchick224 said:

Hi! Not sure where to put this, so feel free to remove if necessary.

I am currently a second grade teacher and have been the past twelve years and I can say I am no longer happy. Weather has always been a passion of mine, and the older I get and the less time I have left, the more I want to go for it.

However, math was always a weak spot for me. I noticed with some of the programs I am looking at, a lot of Calculus is necessary. I haven’t taken that type of math in 13 years. emoji30.png

For meteorologists on the board, do your have any useful tips or suggestions on how to do well on the math that comes with a weather degree? Thank you in advance.


.

I can't answer your question, but wanted to say it's never too late to follow your dreams! My friend of 33 years just graduated nursing school this past summer. At 50 she decided to go for it and will tell you it was the best decision she ever made for herself. Good luck!! 

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19 minutes ago, Tigerchick224 said:

Hi! Not sure where to put this, so feel free to remove if necessary.

I am currently a second grade teacher and have been the past twelve years and I can say I am no longer happy. Weather has always been a passion of mine, and the older I get and the less time I have left, the more I want to go for it.

However, math was always a weak spot for me. I noticed with some of the programs I am looking at, a lot of Calculus is necessary. I haven’t taken that type of math in 13 years. emoji30.png

For meteorologists on the board, do your have any useful tips or suggestions on how to do well on the math that comes with a weather degree? Thank you in advance.


.

Thanks for sharing. I have thought about it as well. I think the pandemic has made people realize life is too short and difficult to settle for an unhappy career. I have a B.A. degree but also have trouble in math. UNCA has a good program I know. I just feel like it would be difficult to abandon a career I have spent 8 years in trying to movd up in to start over. Good luck in whatever you decide! 

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