Jump to content

OKpowdah

Moderator Meteorologist
  • Content count

    6,036
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by OKpowdah

  1. OKpowdah

    The Post Christmas storm threat is still vey real

    I think the Euro will look very much like last night, slid east 40 miles
  2. OKpowdah

    The Post Christmas storm threat is still vey real

    Can we PLEASE limit the use of the term "KU"? It doesn't just refer to a big snow storm. Half of the references I see are incorrect. New England can get demolished in a non-KU event. In fact, most of those cases are near misses.
  3. OKpowdah

    The Post Christmas storm threat is still vey real

    The lead s/w is killing us too by knocking down the east coast ridging. BUT the Quebec energy is west If we get part 1 to work out, part 2 is starting to shape up nicely
  4. OKpowdah

    The Post Christmas storm threat is still vey real

    Your thread is on pace to make the AmericanWx Hall of Fail
  5. OKpowdah

    The Post Christmas storm threat is still vey real

    Looks like it'll pretty bad for the Mid Atlantic, but probably a good hit for eastern New England
  6. OKpowdah

    The Post Christmas storm threat is still vey real

    Just trying to take an objective look at the run. Just because it's a whiff, doesn't mean everything is bad.
  7. OKpowdah

    The Post Christmas storm threat is still vey real

    Alright, the suicide posts are getting pretty ridiculous. It's one run of the NAM. It's bad, yes, but the last couple pages look like something we'd see on the main page *gasp*
  8. OKpowdah

    The Post Christmas storm threat is still vey real

    It was a big player in the outcome of last night's Euro and the 06z GFS
  9. OKpowdah

    The Post Christmas storm threat is still vey real

    One piece of positive from the NAM: It has followed the trend for the Quebec energy to dive down further west.
  10. OKpowdah

    The Post Christmas storm threat is still vey real

    LOL Not a great start to your thread Kevin
  11. If you love it, do it. Pretty darn simple I love meteorology
  12. I'm surprised the JMA hasn't completely removed humans from the field.
  13. Thank you very much! This thread has changed my life. I'm going to switch my major to art
  14. OKpowdah

    Miller A vs Miller B

    Yeah this is also population weighted so the highest correlation is with snowfall in the SE third of NH. I remember watching the radar with Feb 2009 and thinking, wow those guys are getting pounded! I got pretty screwed in SW NH with that storm. But the band in Maine was awesome!
  15. OKpowdah

    Miller A vs Miller B

    The "weak" B list: 1983-01-16, 1994-01-18, 2005-02-10, 2008-01-14, 1987-01-10, 2007-12-03, 2009-02-22, 2008-03-01, 2008-01-01, 2009-02-18, 2008-12-31, 2008-02-22, 2007-12-13, 2008-01-18, 2009-01-07
  16. OKpowdah

    Miller A vs Miller B

    Here's the "strong" B list for NH 1978-02-06, 2003-12-06, 2001-02-05, 1982-04-06, 1984-03-14, 1988-02-12, 2005-01-23, 1996-12-08, 2008-12-21, 1995-02-04, 2005-12-09
  17. OKpowdah

    Miller A vs Miller B

    These are composites of actual events. Specifically, 7 strong A, 6 weak A, 11 strong B, 14 weak B, 5 strong O, 6 weak O. SWFE are essentially the overrunning composites
  18. OKpowdah

    Miller A vs Miller B

    Now that I'm back at college with high speed internet, here's some composite maps for "strong" and "weak" cases of each storm type. The intensity is determined from the population weighted snowfall totals, and then using an arbitrary critical level to approximately evenly split the set
  19. OKpowdah

    Miller A vs Miller B

    Dial-up is a royal pain in the a$$. I dealt with it for 7 years before going to college. I learned to multitask a lot while stuff was loading lol 1969 would certainly take the cake for you guys!
  20. OKpowdah

    Miller A vs Miller B

    agreed. The only reason there arent more in my analysis is that SWFE are often quicker hits not necessarily producing major to crippling accumulation. Many SWFE prior to 2007 were probably off my radar ... so to speak
  21. OKpowdah

    Miller A vs Miller B

    You have no idea ... lol I was so excited for college, just for the internet speed haha
  22. OKpowdah

    Miller A vs Miller B

    It's actually not a transfer of energy. That terminology is incorrectly used many times. What happens is that the primary low is becoming more vertically stacked, and thus losing upper level support (differential vorticity and temperature advections). The best upper level dynamics are now out ahead of the primary low, and as it reaches the coast where a natural baroclinic zone is present between the warm ocean and cold land, a secondary low develops.
  23. OKpowdah

    Miller A vs Miller B

    Thanks. I would post more of the detailed composites, but I'm working with 26.4K dialup right now Working with storms since 1978, I came up with 13 Millar A's, 25 Miller B's, and 11 SWF/Overrunning. Between 1978 and 2007, only storms with accumulation >12" in a decently populated area were used. I weighted snowfall totals by population (only for NH), and came up with composites for strong and weak cases of each storm type. Here's what I got for the top 10 storms 2001-03-06 1993-03-14 1978-02-07 2003-12-08 2001-02-05 2003-02-18 1982-04-07 2003-01-04 1987-01-03 1984-03-14
  24. OKpowdah

    Miller A vs Miller B

    This past summer I did a study of NH snow storms, classifying them as Miller A, Miller B, and SWF (overrunning). Here's a few very generalized composites in the order: Miller A, Miller B (via clipper), Miller B (via Colorado low), SWF
×