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Devastating tornado strikes Joplin, Missouri


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#1296
das

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Here are some pictures that my brother took a week after the tornado. They are mostly from 24th and Iowa where my aunt lived with a few from Hampshire Terrace apartments. Thankfully my aunt had a basement and she survived unscathed. Its was surreal to see this kind of destruction firsthand and definitely shows how powerful mother nature can be.

http://brittoglesby....34543&k=vPdfRrG


Excellent photo set, thanks for posting. There's a lot to be gleaned from them about the microdynamics of a strong tornado in a densely populated area.

#1297
JoMo

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Still seeing a lot of Spring Break groups here in Joplin helping out.

AP ran an article today about Joplin and New Orleans.
http://www.columbiat...-common-ground/

It was interesting they put this in the article:


Joplin also lacks the history of political corruption, cronyism and internecine squabbling that has long characterized New Orleans.
"New Orleans has a history of ineffective government. It's going to be harder for them to get things on track, compared to Joplin," said David McEntire, a professor of emergency administration and planning at the University of North Texas who studies global responses to natural disasters.

The 150,000 sq ft component hospital for Mercy/St John's is almost complete. This will be the permanent structure until the actual hospital is rebuilt. It is made up of 224 structural steel components that have came from California to Joplin via truck. When it's completed in April it will be the quickest and largest acute care hospital ever constructed in the US.
http://news.yahoo.co...-071245033.html

The Facebook page Joplin Tornado Info, as well as Branson Tornado Info (which made their page in January before they were hit by a tornado on Feb 28th) have information about the use of social media for disaster recovery.
It's a good read, especially if you are interested in making a page for your city.

This is a PDF document:
http://extension.mis...20disasters.pdf



And Joplin tornado sirens will only go off the first Monday of the month after the silent siren testing hardware is installed.

#1298
JoMo

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Joplin High School is almost completely gone now, just piles of debris:

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Compared to this after the tornado:

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#1299
Indystorm

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A medical team from the destroyed Mercy St. John's Hospital in Joplin is sharing their experiences here in my Michiana neck of the woods at South Bend Memorial Hospital and at a conference at Notre Dame. Good to learn disaster preparedness procedures for hospitals from those who were directly impacted. Good coverage of their visit by our local news media, especially since the recent tornados in Henryville IN and Dexter MI.

#1300
JoMo

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City of Joplin ordered 4,000 Midland WR-120 weather radios with a Red Cross $50,000 donation and donations from the Joplin First Response tornado fund.

They got the first shipment of 800 in and gave them out at 3 local fire stations today and I believe they were all given away. You had to provide a photo ID and proof of residence, also people were required to sign an agreement that they would not sell the weather radio.

#1301
JoMo

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Out of the 4,000 weather radios ordered, there are 630 left to be handed out.


Boomtown days has been canceled this year since they want to concentrate on the May 22nd event(s).


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 23, 2012 #175

SUBJECT: Community invited to One Year Anniversary: “A Day of Unity”

CONTACT: Lynn Onstot, Public Information Officer
417-624-0820, ext. 204



Community members along with the City of Joplin are finalizing plans for “A Day of Unity” to commemorate the one-year anniversary of the May 22, 2011 tornado. One of the main highlights will include “A Walk of Unity” that travels through the area devastated by the EF-5 twister.

With several stops along the route, the Walk will begin in the eastern side of Joplin, near 17th & Range Line, and move through neighborhoods until reaching Cunningham Park. The Walk is scheduled to begin at approximately 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 22nd and will conclude near the five o’clock hour at the Park in time for a 5:41 p.m. Moment of Silence, with a formal dedication of the bronze plaque inscribed with the names of those who lost their lives in the tornado.

“It is a day to be one as a community, to stand tall and recognize the many facets of this past year,” said Mark Rohr, City Manager. “As we remember the many trials and sadness we’ve experienced, we also acknowledge the courage it takes to move forward in the recovery process.”

One goal for the Walk is to symbolize walking against the wind which exemplifies the resilience of our citizens and how they, in the hours of peril and still today, stand strong and united.

The Walk will also be a time to acknowledge the 119,000+ volunteers who have come from near and far to aid in the rescue, recover and now the rebuilding of Joplin. A special invitation is being extended to the many individuals, organizations and agencies to return and join us on this significant day. But, most importantly, the event is A Walk of Unity to demonstrate the strength as a community and how everyone has worked together setting a new standard in disaster response.

Everyone is encouraged to participate in the manner that suits them, whether walking a portion of the route or the entire distance, or joining along the way in one of the many neighborhoods as they reconnect with their neighbors. The public is also invited to join in the activities at the stops along the route. Details of the route as well as the planned events along the way are being finalized and will be announced in the near future.

Please watch for more announcements about other activities being planned for the Day of Unity.

#1302
on_wx

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No idea if this was posted, but it's from "Cedar Ridge" in Joplin and states it's as the tornado was forming.

There is so much rotation!



#1303
B-Rent

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JoMo

We're headed home this weekend and we always go to Lambert in Ozark. Thought about making a day of it and heading down to see Joplin.

Anywhere specific we would want to check out? More importantly anywhere to keep away from?

#1304
JoMo

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JoMo

We're headed home this weekend and we always go to Lambert in Ozark. Thought about making a day of it and heading down to see Joplin.

Anywhere specific we would want to check out? More importantly anywhere to keep away from?


For a quick tour:

If you take the Rangeline exit off I-44, you can head north to 20th street, you can see all the places that have built back in the commercial district there. Come back west on 20th and enjoy the nothingness that is 20th street. You can see where Hampshire Terrace apartments used to be and Dillons supermarket before you reach where Joplin High School used to be. Head south on Indiana avenue to 26th street where you will turn back west and take 26th all the way back west until you reach Schifferdecker. This will show you the hospital and Cunningham Park. They were working on bringing down the medical buildings around the hospital, but the actual hospital probably won't come down until sometime in late April.

Everything should be open and there aren't really any places to avoid.

Pizza Hut on Rangeline was rebuilt and it reopened yesterday I think.

#1305
JoMo

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Updated vid from Con-Way truck bay. You can see the doors explode inside at about 38 seconds in and one of them kinds of floats around for awhile.




And pretty high quality vid from some chasers just minutes after the tornado moved though on Rangeline.



#1306
JoMo

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We're over the $300 million mark on new construction. 59% built back as far as homes go.

Joplin Globe has an interesting map plotting where these homes are, how much they cost, etc.
http://www.joplinglo...n-since-tornado


But builders are clashing over home sizes and values which may have actually slowed the rebuilding some as Joplin doesn't have specific zoning requirements in the old neighborhoods so you're getting doublewide modular houses beside fancy houses driving the property values down.

http://www.joplinglo...me-sizes-values

#1307
EquusStorm

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It's so great to see that the rebuilding process in Joplin is coming along so nicely. Sure, there'll be a few issues here and there, but all in all it sounds like things continue to improve.

#1308
JoMo

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Big school bond issue going up for vote on April 3rd.

Not only are Joplin High School, Irving Elementary, East Middle School and Elementary #2 going to be rebuilt but they will build gyms that will double as community shelters. There will be the capacity to hold 20,000 people.
http://www.joplinglo...ell-as-students

http://www.joplinglo...-for-bond-issue


High School virtual tour:



Irving virtual tour:


#1309
JoMo

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The school bond unofficially passes. It required 57.1% of the vote, it received somewhere around 57.6%.

That means we'll be getting community shelters, and the schools posted in the last post ^

#1310
EquusStorm

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Wow, that's even better news. Looks like Joplin may come out of this even better and safer than before. Shame it took an EF-5 tornado to start the process though :<

#1311
irishbri74

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Wow, that's even better news. Looks like Joplin may come out of this even better and safer than before. Shame it took an EF-5 tornado to start the process though :<


It's societies nature as a whole to be reactive rather than proactive.

#1312
B-Rent

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I drove around Joplin, Tuesday. I may have actually gotten a bit lost on JoMos hood.

It's so surprising to me that you can still look up in trees and see debris. The other thing, the trees themselves. They are so barren, it's surreal to see a tree with no branches growing leaves.

Sent from my ADR6400L

#1313
JoMo

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Yeah it's pretty shocking that those trees survived the winter and are now coming out of it even though they are disfigured.


The Atlanta based contractor the school district hired to do demolition work is now suing the school district for non-payment.
http://www.joplinglo...School-District

The Bel-Aire shopping center which was destroyed (featured at the first of the storm chaser van tour video where the chasers were fleeing the path) is going to be rebuilt bigger. A Longhorn streakhouse, which is new to Joplin will also be built there.
http://www.joplinglo...-suit-neighbors

Volunteers from Ohio, Chicago, OKC, Tulsa have moved to Joplin since the tornado.
http://www.joplinglo...ity-to-help-out

“The people here are exceptional. I feel like there is something here special that you don’t find everywhere else. They are kind and appreciative. They don’t focus on what they lost, but what they have. It is teaching me lessons and I have grown in a way I’ve never grown before. You can’t put a paycheck on that.”

“We, as people, seek out the company of others like us,” she said. “I have found that here. I fit in.”

#1314
EquusStorm

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I drove around Joplin, Tuesday. I may have actually gotten a bit lost on JoMos hood.

It's so surprising to me that you can still look up in trees and see debris. The other thing, the trees themselves. They are so barren, it's surreal to see a tree with no branches growing leaves.

Sent from my ADR6400L


The trees, oh yes. I've always noticed that surviving trees bear some of the most fascinating (and alien-looking) reminders of tornadoes. Just a couple miles from the house, I go through an area of branchless trees with foliage clusters on their trunks every time I head for town, a reminder of the Saragossa F3 back on Nov 10 2002 that killed 7 people. And a trip to Hackleburg or Phil Campbell shows the same thing there, a landscape of broken tree snags, downed timber, and the occasional alien tree sticking up partially debarked and without branches but bearing clusters of fresh foliage from new growth along the trunk. It's both encouraging and sad, fascinating and bizarre.

#1315
B-Rent

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The trees, oh yes. I've always noticed that surviving trees bear some of the most fascinating (and alien-looking) reminders of tornadoes. Just a couple miles from the house, I go through an area of branchless trees with foliage clusters on their trunks every time I head for town, a reminder of the Saragossa F3 back on Nov 10 2002 that killed 7 people. And a trip to Hackleburg or Phil Campbell shows the same thing there, a landscape of broken tree snags, downed timber, and the occasional alien tree sticking up partially debarked and without branches but bearing clusters of fresh foliage from new growth along the trunk. It's both encouraging and sad, fascinating and bizarre.


Thats the first time I have seen aftermath of major damage. I've had EF1-EF2 events close to me before and seen the immediate damage from those, but to see the size and level of damage there in Joplin, a year after, was amazing. I kept telling my friend giving me the tour, :I didn't expect to still see sheet metal and insulation in the trees."

#1316
JoMo

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Thats the first time I have seen aftermath of major damage. I've had EF1-EF2 events close to me before and seen the immediate damage from those, but to see the size and level of damage there in Joplin, a year after, was amazing. I kept telling my friend giving me the tour, :I didn't expect to still see sheet metal and insulation in the trees."


Anything else that shocked you?

You can still see people's clothes in some of the trees as well. We've had a lot of amazing volunteers come and they've been working on cutting down and clearing out the downed trees in the more forested areas.

#1317
B-Rent

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Anything else that shocked you?

You can still see people's clothes in some of the trees as well. We've had a lot of amazing volunteers come and they've been working on cutting down and clearing out the downed trees in the more forested areas.


Not as much shocked me as should have. I think seeing all of your photos prepared me for what I would see.

You can tell its a changed landscape. After the trees, the very first thing I noticed was the street names painted on the road. I think we were on 22nd st? The one that goes next to the hospital.

It felt more solemn in areas where you KNEW someone died. Walmart, Home Depot, those places. A couple of times I caught my self thinking "It looks so normal here, how is that possible?"

We drove by the hospital, I had tried to explain the modular concept to my my wife, who is a nurse, but she had to see it to understand. It was hard telling on the old hospital, where damage was vs. demolition.

I didn't realize how close your two hospitals were. Talk about a streak of luck.

#1318
EquusStorm

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Thats the first time I have seen aftermath of major damage. I've had EF1-EF2 events close to me before and seen the immediate damage from those, but to see the size and level of damage there in Joplin, a year after, was amazing. I kept telling my friend giving me the tour, :I didn't expect to still see sheet metal and insulation in the trees."


Oh yes, definitely. The difference between EF1-EF2 damage and EF5 damage is staggering and sad. The EF3 damage from 2002 was the worst I'd seen until April 27, and the Hackleburg area was my first experience with EF5 damage (plus Cullman, Bridgeport, Tuscaloosa, Argo Hill, and Sipsey at EF4). Across the road from the Wrangler plant, back in July, you could see hundreds of pairs of jeans and white shirts hanging in tree snags and shrubbery, mixed with twisted metal from the plant itself. It was incredibly surreal. They cleaned it all up now, though, and I lost the photos in a HD crash. All that was left in the immediate area last time I went through was one twisted piece of metal that was part of the entrance gate, along with two perfectly healthy river birches near the destroyed sign for the plant; how those survived is beyond me. That was the center of the path and the tornado was a mile-wide EF4/low EF5 at that time.

It felt more solemn in areas where you KNEW someone died. Walmart, Home Depot, those places. A couple of times I caught my self thinking "It looks so normal here, how is that possible?"


In Phil Campbell especially, it was very sickening to look at all the clean slabs and know for a fact that 26 people died in the area. There's really very little that can compare to that feeling.

But Hackleburg and Phil Campbell are very small towns. Going back to the topic of this thread that I have kind of sidetracked, I can't begin to imagine how awful the scene must have been in Joplin, a city of 50k, in the aftermath of a massive EF5 that plowed straight through the middle of it. Even seeing the pictures probably does no justice to that damage. Just glad to know the city is recovering pretty well. Best wishes for the folks up Missouri way.

#1319
JoMo

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Not as much shocked me as should have. I think seeing all of your photos prepared me for what I would see.
You can tell its a changed landscape. After the trees, the very first thing I noticed was the street names painted on the road. I think we were on 22nd st? The one that goes next to the hospital.
It felt more solemn in areas where you KNEW someone died. Walmart, Home Depot, those places. A couple of times I caught my self thinking "It looks so normal here, how is that possible?"
We drove by the hospital, I had tried to explain the modular concept to my my wife, who is a nurse, but she had to see it to understand. It was hard telling on the old hospital, where damage was vs. demolition.
I didn't realize how close your two hospitals were. Talk about a streak of luck.


The street you were on was probably 26th. The street names are painted on by AmeriCorps volunteers. The street signs that are missing were part of the insurance coverage for the city. It takes a long time to get that sorted out I guess. The cleanup went extremely quickly for the amount of debris that was out there and Wal-mart, Home Depot, Academy rebuilt really quickly.

The two towers at the hospital really haven't been touched due to asbestos abatement still going on so what you saw was tornado damage. The medical buildings just to the south of the hospital have been torn down. The hospitals were really close and even though Freeman wasn't hit by the tornado it did suffer roof damage from the inflow winds.

Mercy uploaded a video of how the components to the component hospital have been built, towards the end you can see a time-lapse video of it being assembled on site. I think Mid-April is the expected opening.




Cunningham Park right across from the hospital has a pool and now, cool new slides that it didn't have before. It's going to open on-time Memorial Weekend.

Posted Image

#1320
B-Rent

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Is that next to the park the tv show built?

#1321
JoMo

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Is that next to the park the tv show built?


yep, Cunningham Pool on the N side of the park.

Small pic of it after the tornado.

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#1322
JoMo

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To go with the whole Easter Theme...... Rise, Neighborhood, Rise!

This is what it looked like before the tornado:
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This is in August, 3 months after the tornado, notice how empty it looks:

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And Fri, April 6th 2012:

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Geese making their migration back north. These geese think that's a pond they are by, when in fact, it's where a house used to be and the foundation was dug out and water collected in the hole.

Posted Image

#1323
JoMo

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KZRG photos of the new St. Johns (Mercy) component hospital. This is the hospital until the real one is built by 2015.

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The proposed new hospital layout:

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#1324
JoMo

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Here's a story that ran a few days ago. It examines Joplin vs Tuscaloosa recovery and how Joplin is using local business and relaxed regulations and restrictions vs Tuscaloosa's regulations and waiting on FEMA:

"

The reason for Joplin's successes and Tuscaloosa's shortcomings? In Tuscaloosa, officials sought to remake the urban landscape top-down, imposing a redevelopment plan on businesses. Joplin took a bottom-up approach, allowing businesses to take the lead in recovery."



The Alabama city's recovery plan, "Tuscaloosa Forward," is indeed state-of-the-art urban planning—and that's the crux of the problem. It sets out to "courageously create a showpiece" of "unique neighborhoods that are healthy, safe, accessible, connected, and sustainable," all anchored by "village centers" for shopping (in a local economy that struggles to sustain current shopping centers). Another goal is to "preserve neighborhood character" from a "disproportionate ratio of renters to owners." The plan never mentions protecting property rights.



In Joplin, the official plan not only makes property rights a priority but clocks in at only 21 pages, compared with Tuscaloosa's 128. Joplin's plan also relied heavily on input from businesses (including through a Citizen's Advisory Recovery Team) instead of Tuscaloosa's reliance on outside consulting firms. "We need to say to our businesses, community, and to our citizens, 'If you guys want to rebuild your houses, we'll do everything we can to make it happen,'" said Joplin City Council member William Scearce in an interview.



http://online.wsj.co...=googlenews_wsj

#1325
JoMo

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Cal Ripken Jr was in town today with Energizer to work on a Habitat House. They donated $10,000 to the local Habitat for Humanity. Photo from KZRG:

Posted Image


More than $311 million in building permits have been issued since the tornado:
http://www.joplinglo...-Joplin-tornado


Video of some of the 18 homes Convoy of Hope is rebuilding in Joplin. These are using the insulated concrete forms where the house is made out of concrete poured into these forms so it's more 'tornado resistant'.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m96bLgEg_9s



And finally, this video is the best I have found that shows what Joplin looks like as of probably a month or so ago. These people take a drive down where the tornado impacted and show the emptiness and the rebuilding. Keep in mind that this area was full of trees and buildings and houses.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7USACWOgW0o

#1326
mapgirl

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The Cal Ripken story was on the news last night up here in MD and on the radio this morning

http://www.wbal.com/...Tornado-Victims


#1327
JoMo

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I know someone was asking about the May 22nd plans here in Joplin. This article should answer some of those, everyone is invited.
http://www.joplinglo...-Joplin-tornado

Also, Chelsea Clinton was at the high school today, she's doing a story for NBC Nightly News. I don't know when it will air.

#1328
JoMo

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NBC Nightly News will air a special segment on Joplin on Monday Night's newscast. They were at the Joplin Prom tonight as well. Over 50 local and National Sponsors helped put the prom together. The first prom since the tornado.
http://www.joplinglo...-at-Joplin-prom

One girl didn't get to go to prom since she's in the hospital with a rare respiratory infection caused by the tornado. The nurses at Cox South in Springfield donated their time and money and transformed a wing of the pediatric ward into a prom for her. Several of her friends from Joplin went up and helped her celebrate.
http://www.ky3.com/n...0,3480093.story


Weather Radios for Duquesne should arrive before long:
http://www.joplinglo...uld-arrive-soon

#1329
codfishsnowman

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Jeff Piotrowskii's video and the aftermath as the pulled up at 20th and Iowa. The new footage begins at 3:50 or so. Not sure why there's a slowdown. At around 4:40 you see the remains of Franklin Tech.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfdK6H9d6J0



No matter how many times I watch this video I get chills up and down my spine!
This is about as frightening as anything I have ever watched on recorded media, whatever anyone wants to say about whether he had the right terminology or anything else ( some of the posts on here seem unbelievably petty!)
This guy took an AMAZING video and he deserves serious credit for watching the weather closely and knowing almost four hours earlier that this was going to be the hot zone. Furthermore he went right down to the area where the big tornado was imminent and he knew that as well, he really deserves major accolades.

In my neck of the woods most of the experts love to beat up on the HRRR model but the fact that this model had the extreme helicity over sw Mo. is also noteworthy and something Tornado experts should be studying in detail.

#1330
JoMo

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No matter how many times I watch this video I get chills up and down my spine!
This is about as frightening as anything I have ever watched on recorded media, whatever anyone wants to say about whether he had the right terminology or anything else ( some of the posts on here seem unbelievably petty!)
This guy took an AMAZING video and he deserves serious credit for watching the weather closely and knowing almost four hours earlier that this was going to be the hot zone. Furthermore he went right down to the area where the big tornado was imminent and he knew that as well, he really deserves major accolades.

In my neck of the woods most of the experts love to beat up on the HRRR model but the fact that this model had the extreme helicity over sw Mo. is also noteworthy and something Tornado experts should be studying in detail.




Jeff has been storm chasing for like 35 years. On his Joplin DVD, it shows them following the parent supercell across KS into MO (which was north of Joplin) and it was pretty ragged and not producing much so they went farther south. They also followed just behind the tornado until they couldn't go any farther due to damage, it was then they pulled down Iowa street and started search and rescue.

On the vid, they black part of it out when he is pulling someone from a house, and there's another part where a lady comes and tells him that 'there's a dead man over there'. He tells her he knows and that there's nothing they can do for him, they just have to help the survivors. He was also making phone calls to the Tulsa NWS to tell them to relay information and get as much help to Joplin as possible. When help doesn't arrive, they go and look for help and find a Carthage Fire Department truck down the road, and they bring them back down that street to start search and rescue farther down the block.



Despite it being 11 months since the tornado I still remember it like it was yesterday.

The HRRR did really well on this day. It doesn't always get things right though. I remember I was looking at it before the tornado and saw that it was developing additional storms across SE KS, NE OK. I thought at the time, these storms would interefere with the big main supercell so I expected a 'cluster' of thunderstorms with high winds, hail and heavy rain. I actually felt a bit better when I saw those additional cells developing on the HRRR. Nothing really different from what we get all the time anyway. I went outside and started moving some of the lawn ornaments and stuff up closer to the house so they wouldn't blow away or get damaged. I never really expected the tornado though. In fact, just 10 days earlier on May 12th there was a storm that showed signs of rotation just west of here. I actually saw it but it was elevated and it had the look of a mesocyclone that was collapsing. It didn't produce anything as it moved to basically the NW of Joplin.

I did notice one thing that did freak me out though on the HRRR other than the crazy helicity, both the LFC and LCL height was the same and it was very low in a very localized area along I-44 from Joplin on a bit northeast. This meant that pretty much any storm would be surface based and low to the ground.

Once the parent supercell that had been in SE KS produced an outflow boundary, and the new strong updrafts in NE OK/SE KS latched on, Joplin's goose was cooked.



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